Dec 09, 2019  
Academic Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Academic Catalog 2019-2020

Flagler College - Tallahassee


  • Introduction
  • Student Responsibilities
  • Education Majors
  • Business and Accounting Majors
  • Academic Information
  • Admissions
  • Student Success Program
  • Requirements for Admission to the Education Department
  • Tuition and Fees
  • Equal Opportunity and Non-Discrimination Policies
  • Payment of Tuition and Fees
  • Tuition Assistance
  • Tuition Refunds for Complete Withdrawals Only
  • Billing Adjustments
  • Financial Aid 
  • Federal Financial Aid
  • Federal Pell Grant
  • Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan
  • Application Procedures for Federal Financial Aid
  • State of Florida Financial Aid
  • Florida EASE Grant (formerly FRAG)
  • Florida Student Assistance Grant (FSAG)
  • Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program
  • Florida Minority Teacher Scholarship
  • Florida Prepaid College Program
  • Flagler College Financial Aid
  • Faculty and Staff, Flagler College-Tallahassee Endowed Scholarship
  • Notification of Financial Aid Awards and Student's Account
  • Satisfactory Academic Progress
  • Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)
  • Maximum Academic Terms of Eligibility
  • Minimum Percentage of Work Completed
  • Appeals
  • Handling of Financial Aid in Cases of Withdrawal
  • Federal Aid
  • State of Florida Aid
  • Handling of Financial Aid when Dropping from Full-Time to Part-Time Status
  • Academic Policies, Regulations and Procedures
  • Academic Honesty
  • Respect and Civility
  • Academic Requirement for Continuation
  • Academic Warning
  • Academic Probation
  • Probationary Admission
  • Academic Suspension
  • Academic Dismissal
  • Suspension or Dismissal during the Semester
  • Administrative Withdrawal during the Semester
  • Writing Competency
  • Class Attendance
  • Continuing Students
  • Graduation Requirements
  • Honors
  • Departmental Awards for Academic Achievement
  • Early Participation in Commencement Ceremonies
  • President's List and Dean's List
  • Block Scheduling
  • Schedule Changes
  • Registration for Continuing Students
  • Student Evaluations
  • Final Examinations
  • Exit Assessment
  • Grade Correction
  • Grading of Academic Work
  • Grade Documentation
  • Change of Grade
  • Incomplete Grade
  • Appeal of Grade
  • Repeat Courses
  • Transfer Credits from Another Institution
  • Transient Transfer Credits from Another Institution
  • Registering for Courses at Another Flagler College Location
  • Course Load
  • Florida Teacher Certification Exam Requirements for Education Majors
  • Policies, Rules and Regulations Pertaining to Student Conduct, Safety and Security
  • T.C.C. Code of Conduct
  • Identification Cards
  • Email Accounts
  • Alcoholic Beverages
  • Destruction of Property
  • Disorderly Conduct
  • Disrespect
  • Faculty-Student Relationships
  • Falsification of Records
  • Firearms, Fireworks, Explosives
  • Bullying and Hazing
  • Notice of Nondiscrimination
  • Non-Prescription and Controlled Substances
  • Privacy of Student Records
  • Readmitted Students
  • Smoking Policy
  • Student Complaints
  • Vehicles and Parking Regulations
  • Violations of Local, State and Federal Laws
  • Withdrawal from the Program
  • Disciplinary Procedures
  • Review and Referral
  • Administrative Disposition
  • College Disciplinary Committee
  • College Continuation Committee
  • Disciplinary Hearing Procedures
  • Types of Disciplinary Actions
  • Reprimands
  • Probation
  • Suspensions
  • Dismissal
  • Expulsion
  • Finality
  • Financial Refund
  • Courses of Instruction
  • The Full Time Faculty
  • Administration
  • Use of Photographs, Video or Other Film by the Collete

INTRODUCTION

 

Flagler College is a four-year, independent, non-sectarian institution, offering programs leading to Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Master of Arts degrees.  Founded in 1968, the College was established as a memorial to Henry M. Flagler, industrialist, oil magnate, land developer, and railroad pioneer.  Flagler was the co-founder of Standard Oil and the single most pivotal figure in Florida's development. 

 

Flagler College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award baccalaureate and master's degrees.  Contact the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Flagler College.

 

The partnership between Flagler College and Tallahassee Community College developed in response to a legislative mandate to increase the opportunities for students seeking four-year degrees, and as a result of an invitation by Dr. T.K. Wetherell, then President of the Tallahassee Community College, to Dr. William L. Proctor, then President of Flagler College.  Established in the fall of the 2000-2001 academic year, the program offered courses leading to Bachelor of Arts degrees in business administration and elementary education.  Enrollment grew to 100 students during the first academic year and in subsequent years expanded to almost 500.  A dual major in Elementary Education/Exceptional Student Education and a fourth major in Accounting were introduced in the fall of the 2002-2003 academic year.  A major in Strategic Communication (Public Relations) was introduced in the fall of the 2014-2015 academic year.  A major in Secondary Education/English was introduced in the fall of the 2018-2019 academic year.

 

The schedule includes both day and evening classes.  Day classes meet Monday through Friday.  Students may participate in the day program on a full-time or part-time basis and may complete up to 16 credit hours per semester. 

 

In the evening program, business administration and accounting classes are scheduled successively with one course meeting for four weeks.  Evening classes meet Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays from 6:00 p.m. to 9:20 p.m. with occasional class meetings on Wednesdays as needed to compensate for Federal holidays or school closure.  This schedule enables students who work, or who have family and/or other commitments, to concentrate on the completion of one course at a time.  In the education and strategic communication evening programs, classes are scheduled successively with two classes meeting for eight weeks.  Students may participate in the evening program on a full-time or part-time basis and may complete up to 13 credit hours per semester.  Even though the classes are conducted consecutively in the evening program, the student enrolls for and is charged for the entire semester at the beginning of the semester.  Therefore, semester fees and drop/add dates apply with respect to drop/add and financial refunds for evening students.



STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

 

Students are responsible for knowing and complying with Flagler College rules and regulations as published in the Flagler College-Tallahassee Bulletin and those verbal or written policies as announced by the college administration.  The Tallahassee Community College (TCC) Student Conduct Code shall apply to students participating in programs delivered through TCC.  The Tallahassee Community College (TCC) Student Conduct Code is defined in the TCC Catalog, the Student Handbook, and on the TCC website.

 

Students are responsible for knowing and abiding by all academic policies, regulations, and procedures as set forth in this Bulletin as well as in the Flagler College Catalog.  The catalog can be found on the Flagler website www.flagler.edu.  Students are also expected to be aware of specific course requirements, as set forth in course syllabi, distributed at the first meeting of each course.

 

Students are also responsible for knowing and abiding by all rules and regulations governing student conduct, which are prescribed to ensure the safety and well-being of all students and to promote the academic and social purposes of the College.

 

Students are given the privilege of enrolling in Flagler College-Tallahassee on the condition that they comply with the institution's rules, regulations, policies, and procedures as they exist at the time of admission and as they may be amended from time to time.  The College reserves the right to suspend or terminate the privilege of attendance if a student violates the rules of conduct or if the student's enrollment is deemed contrary to the best interest of the institution.

 

Students are required to participate in a mandatory advising session in their first semester with Flagler College-Tallahassee.  This allows students to familiarize themselves with their academic advisors and also provides the students with a clear overview of programmatic requirements.

 

Education Majors

All education majors must undergo a criminal background check and obtain a clearance card from Leon County Schools prior to the initial practicum placement within the student's first semester of coursework.  Applications for the criminal background check must be obtained from the Flagler College-Tallahassee office, and students should apply at least four weeks prior to the first day of practicum.  Students will not be allowed in schools to complete the clinical portion of their education without clearance from Leon County Schools.  At the start of each semester, Education majors must also obtain and provide proof of health insurance (mandatory) and professional liability insurance (strongly recommended).  See the Education Department Chair or the Education Department Secretary for more information.

 

Business Administration and Accounting Majors

All students are strongly encouraged to use a laptop computer to complete academic work in and outside of the classroom.  All business administration and accounting majors are required to have a laptop and to bring it to each class session.  Laptop hardware and software requirements are distributed at the time of admission, during orientation, and are posted on the college website. 


 

ACADEMIC INFORMATION

 

The academic program is designed to provide a well-rounded education in the liberal arts tradition.  Majors lead to the Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration, elementary education, elementary/exceptional student education, secondary education/English, or strategic communication (public relations); or a Bachelor of Science degree in accounting.  Minors in marketing and finance are also offered.

 

Academic advising and counseling are provided by the faculty and staff, and Flagler College complies with the requirements of section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.  Students with documented disabilities and/or students with special needs are encouraged to contact the Dean to request academic accommodations.  More information may be found at http://www.flagler.edu/academics/academic-services/disability_services/

 

Admissions 

Applications for admission must be accompanied by a non-refundable application fee of $25.00.  Official copies of all college transcripts must be received prior to acceptance.  All students must have completed an Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree, an Associate of Science (A.S.) degree who have completed all prerequistite requirements necessary for admission into the institution, or have a minimum of 60 transferable college credits that fulfill the general education requirements in which a grade of "C-" was earned.  Applicants who have attended a college or university after receiving an A.A. or A.S degree must be in good standing at the last institution. Students who have earned an A.A. or A.S. degree who are not in good standing at the last institution may be considered for probationary admission by the Admissions Committee.  No more than 64 semester hours may be transferred to Flagler College from a two-year college, and no more than 75 hours may be transferred to Flagler College from a four-year college or university.

 

Admission Requirements:  Applicants who wish to enroll in the Flagler College–Tallahassee program must have earned an Associate of Arts degree (A.A.), an Associate of Science degree (A.S.), or a minimum of 60 transferable college credits in which a grade of C or better was earned from a regionally accredited college or university.  Applicants from Tallahassee Community College who have earned 57 transferable credits may be admitted under the condition that they satisfy the TCC AA requirments within the first semester of enrollment at Flagler College. Applicants who lack an Associate of Arts degree or who have earned the Associate of Science degree may have to take additional courses to satisfy the College's general education requirements.

 

Applicants who have attended a college or university after receiving an A.A. degree or an A.S. degree must be in good standing with a satisfactory grade point average for all work attempted and must be eligible to return to the institution last attended.  Applicants who are not in good standing at the last institution may be considered for probationary admission by the Admissions Committee.

 

To apply to the Flagler College–Tallahassee program:

  1. Complete the online application for admission at www.Flagler.edu/Tallahassee
  2. Submit a non-refundable $25.00 application fee
  3. Submit official transcripts from all college/universities previously attended.

 

 

Student Success Program (SSP)

Flagler College-Tallahassee offers the Student Success Program to help students successfully transition from community college to Bachelor's level college work.  Students entering Flagler College-Tallahassee with a transfer grade-point-average below 2.50 will be assessed by an academic success coach.  After an initial assessment, students may be referred to the PDH 300 personal development class, and/or math, English language skills and reading tutoring as needed.  These students will also meet with the academic success coach and their advisors on a regular basis.  The SSP is designed to strengthen academic foundations and to help students graduate on time.

 

Requirements for Admission to the Education Department

Admissions criteria for the elementary and elementary/exceptional student education majors are based upon Florida Teacher Certification standards.  Education students are permitted two semesters in which to meet all admission requirements including passage of the General Knowledge portion of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam.

 

A student who wishes to major in any area of education must meet the following conditions for acceptance to the Education Department: (1) achieve a cumulative 2.5 grade point average by completion of the first semester at Flagler College-Tallahassee and maintain it throughout the undergraduate program; (2) demonstrate dispositions, character and aptitude for teaching; (3) demonstrate the potential to be accepted for and to perform satisfactorily in a student teaching assignment; and (4) achievement of a passing score on the General Knowledge Test (FTCE).  Because students are expected to demonstrate a satisfactory competence level in all education courses, no grade below C in any education major required course is accepted; this includes ancillary courses that are required for the major, but not an Education Department offering.  A complete description of the Education Department Academic Standards is included in the Education Student Handbook.

 

Tuition and Fees

Application Fee $25.00 payable at the time of application
Advance Deposit $100.00 payable upon confirmation of enrollment
Tuition $225.00 per semester credit hour - payable prior to the beginning of the semester
Late Registration Fee $50.00 for continuing students who do not attend pre-registration to approve their schedule
Graduation Fee $100.00 new students advance deposits will be applied towards this fee
Internship Fee $120.00 payable prior to the beginning of the semester in which the student is to intern *Education Majors only

 

Students seeking admission to Flagler College-Tallahassee must submit a $25.00 non-refundable fee to defray the administrative costs associated with the processing of the application.  Students must supply official transcripts from every college they have attended prior to Flagler College-Tallahassee.

 


Notice of Non-discrimination

Flagler College is committed to diversity, inclusion and pursuit of a higher education with adherence to high ethical standards. It is the policy of Flagler College not to discriminate in its admissions program, student services, or hiring practices on the basis of race, color, gender, religion, national origin, age, disability, marital status, familial status, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or any other protected characteristic.

 

The following persons have been designated to handle inquiries regarding the College's non-discrimination policies:

 

For inquiries regarding non-discrimination on the basis of sex:

Dr. Wayne Riggs, Dean

Flagler College-Tallahassee

University Center

Tallahassee, Florida 32304

850-201-8070

wriggs@flagler.edu

 

OR

Jessica Kobryn, Title IX Coordinator

Flagler College

74 King Street

St. Augustine, Florida 32084

904-826-8553

jkobryn@flagler.edu

 

For inquiries regarding non-discrimination on the basis of disability:

Ms. Linda Smith, Campus Administrative Assistant

Flagler College-Tallahassee

University Center

Tallahassee, Florida 32304

850-201-8070

smithli@flagler.edu

 

OR

Mr. Phillip Pownall

Coordinator of Services for Students with Disabilities

Flagler College

75 King Street

St. Augustine, FL 32084

904-819-6460

PPownall@flagler.edu

 

For inquiries regarding non-discrimination on the basis of age:

Dr. Wayne Riggs, Dean

Flagler College-Tallahasse

University Center

Tallahassee, Florida 32304

850-201-8070

wriggs@flagler.edu

OR

Human Resources

Flagler College

74 King Street

St. Augustine, Florida 32084

904-819-6311

 

More information may be found at http://www.flagler.edu/legal/notice-of-non-discrimination.html



Payment of Tuition and Fees

Payment of the tuition charge is due prior to the beginning of the semester or upon receipt of an invoice from the Office of Business Services.  Students are notified via email each semester that their bill is available for viewing or printing.  The student account statement will reflect all tuition-related charges and credit for financial aid awards that have been approved by the Office of Financial Aid at the time of the statement.  Any awards not shown on the student account statement must be verified and approved by the Office of Financial Aid prior to deducting for purposes of calculating the payment due.  Payment may be made online through Cashnet by following links from the student portal page.  Checks and money orders are accepted for payment at the Flagler College office.  Students who have filed an application for financial aid and/or student loans may be given an extension of this deadline pending receipt of student aid awards.  Late submission or failure to submit the payment for the outstanding balance by the deadline may result in a late fee charge of $50.00.  Failure to submit payment may also result in schedule cancellation.

 

If a student fails to pay their student account bill or any monies due and owing Flagler College at the time of their withdrawal, graduation, dismissal, or notice of not returning, Flagler College may refer his or her delinquent account to a collection agency.  These students will be responsible for paying the collection agency fee, expenses, including reasonable attorney's fees, necessary for the collection of the delinquent account.  Finally, delinquent accounts may be reported to one or more of the national credit bureaus.

 

Tuition Assistance

 

In addition to the federal and state financial aid programs described in the Financial Aid section of this Bulletin, Flagler College – Tallahassee offers a scholarship to the following Tallahassee community partners:

  1. Full-time employees of Tallahassee Community College and their dependents
  2. Full-time employees of area school districts
  3. Graduates of the Fostering Achievement program (current or former foster care participants)
  4. Graduates of the Tallahassee Community College New Start Scholarship program
  5. Law enforcement and public safety officers employed in area counties.

 

Eligible students will receive a tuition scholarship of up to 30% - applied to tuition charges remaining after the deduction of EASE grants.

 

The following discounts are also available:

 

  1. Graduates of Flagler College who return to take additional classes will be eligible for a tuition discount of 50%
  2. Georgia residents are eligible for a tuition discount of 10%

 

Tuition Refunds for Complete Withdrawals

Students who notify the Flagler College-Tallahassee office in writing of their intent to withdraw from the program and students who are dismissed from the program may be eligible for tuition refunds according to the following schedule:

 

  1. 100% adjustment for any student who withdraws or fails to report for classes during the semester's drop/add period (generally the first week of the semester).  
  2. 75% adjustment (75% of charges cancelled) if the last class attended is prior to the end of the fourth week of the semester.
  3. 50% adjustment (50% of charges cancelled) if the last class attended is prior to the end of the sixth week of the semester.
  4. 25% adjustment (25% of charges cancelled) if the last class attended is prior to the end of the tenth week of the semester.
  5. No refund will be made for withdrawals after the beginning of the eleventh week of the semester.
  6. The dates for the fall, spring and summer semesters representing the end of the weeks referenced above will be established prior to the beginning of the semester.

 

NOTE:  This schedule applies to evening students who withdraw completely (from all remaining classes scheduled for the semester) during any one of the four terms.  If an evening student cannot attend all of the scheduled evening courses but does not want to withdraw completely he/she must provide written notice of his or her intent to drop an individual course during the semester's drop/add period in order to receive a full refund for that course.  Adjustments for dropping individual classes are not made after the drop/add period even if the student has not yet attended the course.

 

Billing Adjustments

Students who change the number of hours for which they have registered during the designated drop/add period at the beginning of the semester will be eligible for adjustments on their bills in accordance with their change of schedule.  It should be noted, however, that students who reduce the number of hours to less than 12 will no longer be considered full-time students and may be ineligible for certain types of financial aid.  Please read the following section on Financial Aid.

  

FINANCIAL AID

 

There are two basic sources of funds for financial aid at Flagler College-Tallahassee: the federal government and the State of Florida. 

 

Students must apply for financial aid to establish eligibility.  Regardless of aid applied for, a student is responsible for his or her tuition and fees.  Correct and timely completion of all required forms is the student's responsibility.

 

Following is a description of the aid available under each of these categories and directions on how to apply for that aid.

 

Federal Financial Aid

The following types of federal financial aid are available:

 

Federal Pell Grant

A non-repayable grant awarded to the neediest students, as determined by the results of the FAFSA.  The amount of the grant depends specifically on the student's EFC, and it ranges from $652 to $6,095.

 

Federal Direct Subsidized Loan

A fixed interest rate loan repayable after the student graduates or ceases enrollment on at least a half-time basis.  The amount a student can borrow is based on the student's level of need and his or her year in school.  The maximum amount available for an academic year for a student who has earned 60 or more credit hours is $5,500.  Subsidized loans are interest-free while the student is enrolled in at least six (6) credit hours.

 

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan

A fixed interest rate loan repayable after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled on at least a half-time basis.  The maximum amount available for an academic year for a dependent student who has earned 60 or more credit hours is $7,500.  The maximum amount available for an independent student who has earned 60 or more credit hours is $12,500.  Unsubsidized loans are interest bearing from the time they are disbursed.  Note: Any loan funds that a student receives as a Federal Direct Subsidized Loan will be deducted from the annual maximum Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan amount.

 

Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan

A fixed interest rate loan available to parents of dependent students.  The maximum amount available is determined by subtracting all financial aid the student is receiving from the Estimated Cost of Attendance.  The PLUS loan application can be completed online at https://studentloans.gov

 

If a parent is denied a PLUS Loan due to a negative credit report, then the student is eligible to borrow additional Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan funds above the usual annual limit.  Grade level determines the amount of additional loan funds for which a student may apply, e.g. juniors and seniors may borrow $5,000 more per year.

 

Application Procedures for Federal Financial Aid

Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) via the internet at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Applicatants should be sure to list Flagler College in the Step Six Section and use the Federal School Code for Flagler College:  007893.

 

Students may be required to submit a copy of an official tax transcript and other documents to the Financial Aid Office during the application process.  The Financial Aid Office will provide notification if additional documents are required.

 

State of Florida Financial Aid

The following types of financial aid are available to Florida residents:

 

Florida EASE Grant (Formerly FRAG)

The FRAG was created by the 1979 Florida Legislature to provide tuition assistance to resident students attending eligible nonprofit colleges and universities located in the state.  Funds for the support of the EASE Grant are contingent each year on the appropriations made available by the Florida Legislature.  Thus, the amount of the grant varies from year to year.

 

Since the EASE Grant is a "tuition-specific" grant, the amount of the grant cannot exceed the cost of tuition.  Further, if a student receives other "tuition-specific" assistance such as a private scholarship or Florida Pre-paid Program payments, the EASE Grant is subject to reduction so that the contribution of "tuition-specific" assistance does not exceed the cost of tuition.

 

To receive the EASE Grant, at least one of a dependent student's parents must have been a one-year resident of the State of Florida prior to the first day of classes of the semester.  For an independent student, he or she must have been a one-year resident, for other than educational purposes, prior to the first day of classes of the semester.  A student must possess a high school diploma or GED, be enrolled on a full-time basis (12 hours or more), must be pursuing his or her first undergraduate degree, and must meet very specific Satisfactory Academic Progress requirements.  These requirements include but are not limited to:  maintaining a cumulative GPA of 2.0 and earning 12 hours each semester for which the EASE Grant is received.  A student can only receive the EASE Grant for a maximum of nine semesters.

 

To apply for the EASE Grant, a student must complete the Florida Residency Affidavit, which can be located under the forms tab at financialaid.flagler.edu.  The deadline date is October 2nd for fall entrants and February 12th for spring entrants.  Students should understand that these deadlines are after school has already begun.  If they delay applying for the EASE Grant until these deadlines, they will be responsible for their full tuition or may be denied clearance for that semester's classes.

 

Florida Student Assistance Grant (FSAG)

To receive the FSAG, a student must meet the eligibility requirements described above for the EASE Grant and have an EFC (as established by the FAFSA) at or below the State's qualifying EFC benchmark.  Each year, the State sets a qualifying EFC benchmark, with any student at or under the EFC being potentially eligible.

 

A student who submits the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is automatically considered.  The amount of the grant depends on funds provided by the State legislature, but awards can range from $200-$2,610 per year.

 

Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program

A student transferring in to Flagler College who has been receiving the Florida Academic Scholars Scholarship or Florida Medallion Scholarship is eligible to continue receiving the scholarship if he or she has met the grade and hour requirement for renewal.  The student should notify the Financial Aid Office that he or she has been receiving such a scholarship so that the state can be contacted for an eligibility determination.

 

Florida Minority Teacher Scholarship

This scholarship was initiated to attract minority students into teaching careers in the State of Florida.  The amount of the scholarship is $4,000 per year.  A student must be a minority (African-American, Asian-American, Hispanic-American, Native American).  In addition, a student must be a Florida resident, a junior or senior, and must be accepted into the Teacher Education Program at Flagler College.  The student must have met all entrance requirements including passage of the General Knowledge portion of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam.   Preference is given to community college transfer students.  A student must have no more than 16 upper division credits when applying for the FFMT scholarship.  A student may obtain an application from the Coordinator of Financial Aid.  The application should be submitted to the Coordinator of Financial Aid two weeks prior to the deadline stated in the application.  A student may apply for this grant at ffmt.org.

 

Florida Prepaid College Program

A student who has entitlements under the Florida Prepaid College program may have his or her entitlements transferred to Flagler College.  The student should contact both the Florida Prepaid Program (800-552-4723) and the Financial Aid Office to make arrangements for this transfer.  It is the student's responsibility to arrange for the transfer of entitlements from the institution he or she previously attended to Flagler College.  Students are expected and responsible for filling out a Florida Prepaid semester authorization form, each semester.

 

Flagler College Financial Aid

The following Flagler College financial aid is available:

 

Faculty and Staff, Flagler College-Tallahassee Endowed Scholarship

This scholarship was made possible by the generous gifts of faculty and staff of Flagler College-Tallahassee.  One award of $500 each is made on an annual basis to one student majoring in education and one student majoring in business or accounting.

 

  1. To the extent possible, the recipient shall meet the following qualifications:
  2. The recipient shall be a full-time student at Flagler College-Tallahassee;
  3. The recipient shall be in good standing with the College;
  4. The recipient shall have a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or above on a 4.0 scale; and
  5. Preference will be given to a student with demonstrated financial need, as determined by the Director of Financial Aid at Flagler College.

 

Notification of Financial Aid Awards and the Student's Account

When the student has been accepted to the College and confirmed his or her enrollment by submitting an advance deposit, the Financial Aid Office will determine the student's eligibility for financial aid and notify the student by means of an award letter.  An award letter is emailed to continuing students once their grades from the previous semester have been posted by the College.

 

The award letter will indicate all items of financial aid of which the Financial Aid Office is aware at the time.  If additional aid is received later, this could affect the aid already awarded.

 

In some instances, an award item will be marked as tentative or pending.  This usually means that the Financial Aid Office is awaiting confirmation from the source of the award or awaiting some action on the student's part.

 

Students who are awarded (offered) financial aid (including grants and loans) must log on to financialaid.flagler.edu and accept or decline the award.  If a student is a dependent student, his or her parents may be eligible for a Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan.  PLUS Loans are not awarded (offered) or indicated on the award letter until the PLUS Loan application is received at the Financial Aid Office.

 

If a student informs the Financial Aid Office about a private source scholarship, it will be indicated on the student's award letter as a tentative/pending award until confirmation is received from the provider of the scholarship.  Private scholarship funds are applied upon receipt.  The student is responsible for following up with the donor and the balance due if funds are not sent directly to the College.

 

Each item of confirmed financial aid will be credited directly to the student's account in the Business Office.  Tentative/pending awards are not formally credited to a student's account; however, in some cases, the Business Office may allow tentative credit when the student pays the bill.  This is particularly true in the case of loans when a student has applied for a loan, but the actual disbursement has not been received.

 

If the aggregate total of a student's confirmed financial aid exceeds the Business Office charges, the student can receive a refund for the excess amount.  Refunds are not made when the excess balance is credited by tentative/pending awards.  Refunds will be issued in accordance with the refund choice selected by the student (ACH or paper check).  Students may contact the Business Office with questions regarding refunds.

 

Please Note:  The timing of the receipt of credit refunds is subject to many delays.  Students are cautioned not to rely on refunds to cover ongoing expenses with specific deadlines for payment such as rent. 

 

Evening students who are otherwise eligible for credit refunds must attend the second class of the semester (or six credit hours) before financial aid can be applied towards their account.  Therefore, evening students who are eligible should expect their credit refund no earlier than the 7th-8th week of the semester. 

 

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Financial aid recipients are required to maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress to be eligible for financial aid.  Satisfactory Academic Progress is comprised of three elements:  Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA), Maximum Academic Terms of Eligibility, and Minimum Percentage of Work Completed per Academic Year.

 

Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA)

Federal financial aid recipients must meet the CGPA requirements specified below.  Only grades earned at Flagler College will be used in the GPA calculation.

 

Semester Hours Earned Up to

Cumulative Grade Point Average

72

1.92

84

1.96

96

2.00

108

2.00

120

2.00

 

There are certain State of Florida grants/scholarships that require a higher CGPA for renewal than those mentioned above.  Following are those grants/scholarships in this category with the CGPA required for renewal indicated:

 

Florida EASE Grant (Formerly FRAG)                                 2.00

Florida Merit Scholarship                                                     2.75

Florida Academic Scholars Scholarship                              3.00

Florida Top Scholars Scholarship                                        3.00

Florida Minority Teacher Education Scholarship                 2.50

 

Note:  For the EASE Grant, a one-year grace period is allowed if the CGPA falls below 2.0.  For the Florida Academic Scholars and the Florida Top Scholars Scholarships, if the required 3.0 CGPA is not attained, these scholarships can be converted to the Florida Merit Scholarship if the student has at least a CGPA of 2.75.

 

Maximum Academic Terms of Eligibility

A student is eligible to receive need-based financial aid for a maximum of 12 semesters of attendance.  Attendance at all post-secondary schools is counted.  Awards not based on need are normally available for a maximum of eight semesters.  The EASE Grant is available for nine semesters.  The Florida Academic Scholars and Florida Merit Scholarship are available for a maximum of 120 semester hours.

 

Minimum Percentage of Work Completed

A student must complete a minimum of 67% of all credit hours attempted.  The completion percentage will be calculated as the total number of completed credit hours divided by the total number of attempted credit hours.  Institutionally accepted transfer hours count as completed credit hours and include credit hours earned at other institutions, CLEP, international baccalaureate, AICE, and AP.  These transfer hours will not be counted in the GPA calculation to meet the Qualitative standard.  In the case of a repeated course, the most recent attempt of a repeated course will count as completed hours if a passing grade is earned.  For financial aid purposes, students are allowed only one repeat of course that was previously passed.

 

To be eligible for renewal, most grants/scholarships sponsored by the State of Florida require that the student earn the equivalent of 12 hours for each semester the student receives such a grant or scholarship during the preceding year.  Hours earned during the succeeding summer school cannot be counted toward the fall and spring hours.

 

The scholarships under the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program (Top Scholars, Academic Scholars, and Medallion Scholarship) require that the student earn the equivalent hours for each semester the scholarship is received.

 

Appeals

A student has the right to appeal the denial of aid under this policy.  The Flagler College-Tallahassee Financial Aid Office should be contacted for procedures.

 

Handling of Financial Aid in Cases of Withdrawal

A student who does not begin attending classes is not eligible for any type of financial aid.  Also, as discussed later in this section, a student is not eligible for any type of aid sponsored by the State of Florida if he or she withdraws before the end of the drop/add period.  In either case, each item of financial aid will be canceled and returned to its source.

 

When a student begins attendance and subsequently withdraws, his or her financial aid is subject to adjustment depending on the withdrawal date and the type of aid.  The adjustment will involve a determination of how much of the student's financial aid was "earned" and how much was "unearned."  Earned financial aid will be retained in the student's account to apply to his or her charges.  If the earned aid exceeds the student's adjusted charges, it can be retained by the student for other educational expenses.  The financial aid that is unearned will be withdrawn from the student's account and returned to the source(s).

 

It should be noted that there will be instances of withdrawal when the amount of earned aid will be disproportionately lower to the adjusted charges than the original amount of aid was to the original charges.  In such instances, the student will be required to make payment using his or her own funds.  Also, there will be instances when, before withdrawal, a student will have been given a refund by the Business Office because his or her payments and/or financial aid total exceeded the charges assessed, but upon withdrawing, the student will have to repay some of these funds.

 

The following paragraphs describe how each of the major sources of financial aid will be handled when a student withdraws.

 

Federal Aid

Federal Aid includes:  Federal Direct Subsidized Loan, Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan, Federal Direct Parent PLUS Loan, Pell Grant, SEOG Grant, and TEACH Grant.

 

A student who withdraws during the first 60% of a semester (beginning with the first day of classes) will have his or her federal aid adjusted based on the amount of time the student was enrolled.  The amount of federal aid a student "earns" will be directly proportional to the percentage of time enrolled.  There is no adjustment of federal aid after the 60% period.

 

The unearned amount of federal aid will be returned to the source using the following distribution priority:  Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Subsidized Stafford Loan, Parent Loan (PLUS), Pell Grant, SEOG Grant, and TEACH Grant.

 

Example:  A student has $4,000 of federal aid consisting of a $2,000 Federal Direct Subsidized Loan, and a $2,000 Pell Grant.  The student earns 30% ($1,200) with 70% ($2,800) unearned.  Using the prescribed distribution, the Federal Direct Subsidized Loan of $2,000 would be returned, and then $800 of the Pell Grant would be returned.

 

If the amount required to be returned is not available in the student's account, it is the student's responsibility to repay these funds to the College.  In some instances, the student will be required to return funds in addition to what the College has to return.  These students will receive a letter from the College regarding the additional amount of unearned aid and how to repay it.

 

State of Florida Aid

Included in this category are all grants and scholarships administered and/or sponsored by the State of Florida.

 

As previously mentioned, a student is not eligible for any Florida-sponsored aid if he or she withdraws before the end of the drop/add period.

 

A student who withdraws after the drop/add period will retain the Florida Aid received for the semester; however, the student will have failed to complete the hours needed to continue receiving the specific Florida Aid Funds and will therefore be ineligible for those funds in future semesters.  Exception: the Florida Bright Futures Scholarship Program (Florida Academic Scholars Scholarship and Florida Medallion Scholarship) requires funds to be returned to the State for any courses withdrawn/dropped by a student after the end of the drop/add period, unless the student has been granted an exception by the Florida Department of Education.

 

Handling of Financial Aid when Dropping from Full-Time to Part-Time Status

When a student begins a semester as a full-time student (12 hours or more) but subsequently reduces his or her course load, resulting in less than full-time enrollment, the student's financial aid likely will be affected.  Also, a reduction in course load could affect the student's eligibility for aid in the following years, since some aid requires that a specific number of hours be earned for renewal of that aid.  (See section on Satisfactory Academic Progress).  Before changing enrollment status from full-time to part-time status, a student should consult with the Financial Aid Office to ascertain the effect of that action on his or her aid.

 


ACADEMIC POLICIES, REGULATIONS, AND PROCEDURES

 

Academic Honesty

Flagler College affirms the value of academic honesty and requires all students to adhere to the highest standards of integrity in their academic work.  Students are entrusted to be honest in every phase of their academic life and to present as their own work only that which is genuinely theirs.  Cheating, plagiarism, violation of test conditions, complicity in dishonest behavior, or other falsification of academic work is a serious breach of college expectations and is subject to immediate disciplinary action.  

 

Plagiarism is defined as any attempt to represent the work of another as one's own original work.  More specifically, plagiarism is the direct appropriation of the language, thoughts or ideas of another, either literally or in paraphrase, without appropriate notification of the source and in such fashion as to imply that the work is one's own original work.  To this end, Flagler College subscribes to Turnitin.com, a web-based plagiarism detection service, which enables professors to determine if a paper has been documented properly.  

 

Fabrication is defined as the use of created or invented information or research for the purpose of deceiving an instructor or other college personnel. 

 

Bribery is defined as the promising, offering, giving, receiving or soliciting of any materials, items or services of value to influence the judgment or conduct of college personnel.

 

Misrepresentation is defined as giving false information to any college representative with the intent to deceive or gain an unfair advantage.  This may include using computer files generated by another person and submitting the information to an instructor as one's own work (unless expressly allowed by the instructor).

 

Cheating is defined as using, or attempting to use, in any academic exercise materials, information, study aids, or electronic data that the student knows or should know is unauthorized.  Cheating also encompasses the provision or acceptance of any unauthorized assistance during an examination or assignment to be completed individually, including but not limited to talking to another student, viewing or copying another student's examination or assignment, making or receiving gestures from another student, communicating via chat, messenger or smart device, or engaging another person to complete an assessment or examination in place of the student.

Instructors are responsible for explaining to students what constitutes academic dishonesty in relation to particular course requirements.  Instructors are also responsible for ensuring that examinations and quizzes are administered in a fashion that discourages dishonesty.

Depending upon the nature of the case, a student guilty of academic dishonesty may receive a penalty ranging from a grade of "WF" or "F" for the work in question to expulsion from the College.  The official actions of the College may be solely academic in nature or both academic and disciplinary. 

 

In all cases wherein an instructor accuses a student of academic dishonesty, the instructor will confer in private with the student and will inform the student of the charge of academic dishonesty as well as the penalty.  The instructor will make a written record of the conference, will confirm in writing the accusation and penalty recommended, and will immediately refer the matter to the Department Chair.

 

The Department Chair will confer with the instructor, review the charge, meet with the accused student, and inform the student of the penalty to be imposed.  The penalty may be more or less severe than that recommended by the instructor.  The student will be advised that he or she may accept the penalty or may request a hearing.  If the student accepts the decision of the Chair, that decision will be binding.  In the event that the student denies the allegation or objects to the severity of the penalty, the student may request a hearing before the Committee on Academic Standing.

 

The request for a hearing will be referred to the Committee on Academic Standing by the Department Chair.  The faculty or staff member reporting the incident of alleged academic dishonesty will be responsible for preparing all material dealing with the case such as evidence, witnesses, etc.  The Department Chair will prepare and issue the charge.

 

The procedure for the hearing is as follows:

 

  1. Notice.  As soon as reasonably possible after the incident occurs, a written notice of the charge shall be given to the student by the Department Chair. The notice will include:
    1. a statement of the date, time and place of the hearing;
    2. a statement of the composition of the Committee on Academic Standing and the nature of the hearing; and
    3. a statement of the charge.

 

All parties shall be notified of the hearing at least one week in advance.  The accused student, however, may waive the right to the one-week notification of his or her case.  The student will acknowledge receipt of the notice by signing and returning it to the Department Chair.  The signed notice will become a part of the record.

 

  1. Safeguard the Student's Rights.  The Committee will consist of three faculty members.  At least two of the members must come from a department other than that of the student being charged.  All members of the Committee on Academic Standing, except the Chair, will refrain from pre-hearing conferences with any student involved in a scheduled hearing.  The chair will advise the student of his or her rights and of the evidence being presented.

 

  1. An Orderly Hearing.  Academic dishonesty hearings are considered to be of an administrative nature; hence, the presence of counsel and the cross examination of witnesses are precluded.  The student has the right to call witnesses to testify on his or her behalf and to present evidence in his or her defense.  The hearing will be closed to any other persons not immediately involved in the situation.

 

If a student fails to appear at the specified hearing time, the hearing may proceed in the student's absence, and a decision may be rendered.  The student, however, may request a postponement in the hearing, provided that the request is made at least 24 hours in advance of the hearing for good cause.  The request for postponement must be submitted to the Chair of the Committee on Academic Standing, who may grant the request at his or her discretion.

 

The Chair may admit credible affidavits, and the members shall use their discretion in determining the validity or amount of weight to be given to such affidavits.

 

After all witnesses have been heard and all other testimony has been presented, the student shall be allowed to summarize his or her position.  Upon the completion of the presentation of evidence, the Chair shall recess the hearing, and the members shall meet privately to determine whether the charges are substantiated.  During the deliberations, each member bears an equal responsibility for decision‑making and must cast a vote for or against all motions.  All decisions are determined by majority vote. The Chair votes only in the event of a tie.

 

All aspects of deliberations must be treated as confidential by the committee members.  If the student is found guilty of academic dishonesty, the Committee on Academic Standing will recommend action or actions to be taken by the Department Chair.  Such action may be of an academic, as well as of a disciplinary, nature.

 

  1. Appeal.  The student has the right to appeal the decision of the Committee on Academic Standing.  The appeal must be in writing and must be submitted to the Dean within three days of notification of the Department Chair's decision. Such appeals are not of a de novo nature.

 

In the event that a charge of academic dishonesty occurs at the end of the semester and involves a graduating senior, a diploma will not be awarded to the student until the matter has been resolved sufficiently to justify the awarding of a degree.  The student's right to appeal the charge will follow the prescribed procedures described, and every effort will be made to ensure the timely and fair adjudication of the case.

 

Respect and Civility

Flagler College students are expected to be courteous, polite, and respectful toward faculty, staff, administration, guests, and other students.  When a student is reported for being disrespectful, rude, or discourteous, severe disciplinary action may be initiated.

Flagler College students are expected to demonstrate civility in their speech and behavior.Civility is defined as courteous behavior and politeness.Students should note that this policy extends to electronic communications and person-to-person communications, in both campus offices and classrooms and off-campus venues such as practicum and internships settings.

 

In the case of a suspected case of incivility, a faculty or staff member will contact the Campus Dean and/or Department Chairperson in writing.  Once the administrator(s) becomes aware of the situation, a meeting will be scheduled with the faculty or staff member.  After hearing the faculty or staff member, a meeting will be scheduled with the student or students involved.  Periodically, additional individuals who witnessed the incident may be called to meet with the Dean and/or Department Chair.

 

At this point, a determination will be made as to whether there was a case of incivility.  In the case where incivility has occurred, an appropriate disciplinary action will be reached and offered to the student as the result of Administrative Disposition.  The student has the right to accept the results of the disposition or to have a hearing before the College Disciplinary Committee.  Procedures for a College Disciplinary Committee hearing may be found on page 38 of this document.

 

Academic Requirement for Continuation  

Students are required to maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or better to remain in good academic standing.  In compliance with the Florida Department of Education, education majors must maintain a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 to maintain their status in the Education Program

 

The following procedures are designed to ensure thorough consideration of a student's progress and qualifications for continuation.  At the conclusion of each term, the Dean and Department Chairs review the academic records of students whose semester average or cumulative average fall below a 2.0 (accounting, business administration, or strategic communication majors,) and 2.5 (education majors).  The Dean and Department Chairs consider the student's cumulative grade point average, semester grade point average, number of semesters enrolled at Flagler College-Tallahassee, current academic status, declared major, performance related to academic aptitude, and performance related to the guidelines for continuation.  Listed below are explanations of, and conditions for, the four types of action that can be taken by the Dean.

 

Academic Warning: An academic warning is issued to students whose semester grade point average is below 2.0 (accounting, business administration, or strategic communication majors) or 2.5 (education majors) and/or whose good academic standing is in jeopardy.  Academic warning is a precautionary admonition that is meant to draw attention to a student's academic performance and to encourage renewed diligence in the pursuit of educational goals.

 

Academic Probation: A student whose cumulative grade point average is below 2.0 (accounting, business administration, or strategic communication majors,) or 2.5 (education majors), or whose academic performance is judged to be of poor quality, will be placed on academic probation.  Probation covers a stated trial period during which it is determined whether the student is returned to good standing, remains on probation, or is dismissed at the end of the probation period for failure to meet the stated academic standards.

 

Students placed on academic probation are expected to complete at least 12 semester hours and to achieve a 2.0 (accounting, business administration, strategic communication majors) or 2.5 (education majors) grade point average in the subsequent semester.  Based upon a review of the student's academic record, other conditions for continuation may also be stipulated.  Students on probation are notified in writing of any continuation requirements that must be satisfied in the subsequent semester, and a copy of the notification is kept on file in the student's permanent record.  Failure to satisfy any of these conditions may result in a continuation review and academic dismissal.  The Dean, at his or her discretion and irrespective of grades, may declare probationary status for any student whose time or talents are not being used properly.

  

Probationary Admission

A student whose transfer grade point average is 2.49 or below may be admitted on a probationary basis for the first semester of enrollment.  Specific requirements of the probationary semester may include intensive academic advising, tutoring, and completion of the PDH 300 course.

 

Academic Suspension: Academic suspension is the involuntary separation of the student from the College.  Student records are reviewed carefully before a decision for suspension is made.  Students are subject to academic suspension if, in the professional judgment of the Dean, the student's academic performance is consistently below the College's standards or otherwise indicates the inability to maintain good academic standing.  Academic suspension will be for a specified time.  Students who are academically suspended must go through the Flagler College readmission process.

 

Academic Dismissal: Academic dismissal is the involuntary separation of the student from the College.  Dismissal may or may not be a permanent separation, and it does not entail a definite time of eligibility to return.  Student records are reviewed carefully before a decision for dismissal is made.  Students are subject to academic dismissal if, in the professional judgment of the Dean, the student's academic performance is consistently below the College's standards or otherwise indicates the inability to maintain good academic standing.

 

Criteria used in a decision for dismissal include any of the following:

  1. failure to maintain a minimal level of academic progress from semester to semester, as suggested in the following guidelines.  (Note that these guidelines are for accounting, business administration, strategic communication majors.  Education majors must maintain a 2.5 cumulative grade point average.)

Semester Hours Earned up to...

Cumulative Grade Point Average

72

1.92

84

1.96

96

2.00

108

2.00

120

2.00

  1. failure to meet the stipulated conditions for continuation as specified in the notification of being placed on academic probation;
  2. failure to remove the probationary status after two consecutive semesters on probation; and
  3. failure to make satisfactory academic progress toward fulfilling degree requirements beyond the junior year.

 

The guidelines for continuation listed in (1) above are regarded as minimal levels of progress.  Students who fall below these levels are subject to automatic dismissal; however, students who are above these minimal requirements, but below the required 2.0 cumulative grade point average, are also subject to academic dismissal.

 

A decision for dismissal ultimately is made on the basis of a student's total academic record and in light of appropriate expectations of academic progress.  Students who are experiencing academic difficulty are strongly encouraged to seek assistance from their academic advisors, their course instructors, and the academic department chairs.

 

In the case of dismissal, a student may appeal the decision and request to be reinstated as a full-time student.  All such appeals must be directed to the College Chancellor within a period of time specified in the letter of dismissal.  This appeal may be granted if, in the judgment of the Chancellor, such a decision will benefit both the student and the program.

 

Suspension or Dismissal during the Semester

Students who are dismissed during the semester for disciplinary reasons will receive a grade of withdraw failing (WF) for the courses in which they were enrolled.  In light of the block scheduling at Flagler College-Tallahassee, a suspension may result in future scheduling difficulties, and a possible delay in the student's expected graduation date and continuing financial aid.  Therefore students will be required to meet with their academic advisors to review the impact of the suspension.

 

Administrative Withdrawal during the Semester

Students who miss more than 20% of any course for any reason will be administratively withdrawn from the class.  The transcript will reflect a grade of W or WF, depending upon the date by which the 20% limit is exceeded.  The course will need to be repeated at a future date.  In light of the block scheduling at Flagler College-Tallahassee, a withdrawal from a course may result in future scheduling difficulties and a possible delay in the student's expected graduation date and continuing financial aid.  Therefore, students will be required to meet with their academic advisors to review the impact of the withdrawal.

 

Writing Competency

To ensure the quality of the Flagler College degree, it is expected that all Flagler students will write at a college level.  The College offers a writing skills course to help students who have writing deficiencies attain a level of writing proficiency that will help them succeed in their academic and professional lives.  Students may be referred to the ENG 010 – Writing Skills course at the recommendation of any instructor or Flagler academic success coach.  Students may be recommended to an academic success coach to work on improving writing competency in addition to or in lieu of referral to ENG 010.

 

Any student referred to this class must pass ENG 010 before graduating from Flagler College.  ENG 010 is a non-credit course and will be graded on a (P) or (F) basis.  Subsequent referrals might be possible based upon a student's performance in later classes.  Students are encouraged to take advantage of resources available to them on the TCC campus.  TCC's Learning Commons is open to all Flagler students who wish to improve their writing skills.

 

Class Attendance   

 

Flagler College - Tallahassee holds all member of our community to the highest academic standards in its pursuit of academic excellence. Regular attendance at classes, laboratories and examinations is fundamental to this commitment. Students are, therefore, expected to attend class as part of their personal responsibility as members of this community.

 

Individual professors will establish specific attendance policies for each class and publish them in the syllabus at the beginning of every academic semester.  Professors must also discuss with students on the first day of class the relationship between attendance, interaction in the classroom, and evaluation in specific courses.  Students have the responsibility to take appropriate action to make up missed work.

 

Absences for official college events, for example athletic or club travel, must be appropriately documented.  All absences should be discussed with the professor in advance when possible.  

 

Continuing Students

A continuing student, sometimes referred to as a returning student, is a student who was enrolled full-time during the previous semester.  A continuing student is also a part-time student who enrolls full-time for the next immediate academic semester.

 

Graduation Requirements

Business administration, accounting, and strategic communication (public relations) major degree requirements include completion of 120 semester hours with a minimum grade point average of 2.0 with no more than one grade below a C- earned in major course requirements.  Elementary education, elementary/exceptional student education, and secondary education/English majors must complete a minimum of 120 semester hours with a minimum grade point average of 2.5, and no grade below C- is permitted in major course requirements.  The last consecutive 30 semester hours of all programs must be earned at Flagler College-Tallahassee.

 

Flagler College-Tallahassee holds two commencement ceremonies per year, in December and in May.  Participation in the commencement ceremony is an academic requirement for graduation.  Exceptions are granted under extremely unusual or emergency situations and must be requested and approved in writing no later than the time of graduation clearance. 

 

Students must meet all graduation deadlines to be eligible to graduate.  These include dates for completing the graduation checklist, payment of the graduation fee, attendance at graduation clearance and rehearsal, as well as any programmatic specific deadlines. 

 

Honors

Three degrees of distinction are awarded to graduating seniors based on their cumulative grade point averages for all graded academic work (does not include Pass/Fail) completed while at Flagler College-Tallahassee, including the semester's work in which the baccalaureate degree requirements are completed.  According to the level of academic achievement, the degree may be awarded cum laude (3.5-3.69), magna cum laude (3.7-3.89), or summa cum laude (3.9-4.0).

 

To qualify for graduation with honors, a student majoring in accounting, business administration, or strategic communication (public relations) must complete at least 56 credit hours of academic work at Flagler College-Tallahassee that carry letter grades of A, B, C, or D.  Pass/fail options are not applicable.  All courses for which no quality points are assigned are included in this pass/fail category.

 

A student majoring in elementary education, elementary/exceptional student education, or secondary education/English must complete at least 45 credit hours of academic work at Flagler College-Tallahassee that carry letter grades of A, B, C, or D and have completed all testing requirements.  Pass/fail options are not applicable.

 

Departmental Awards for Academic Achievement

Departmental Awards for Academic Achievement are presented to graduating seniors who have distinguished themselves through scholarly activity and academic achievement in their selected disciplines of study.  Recipients of these departmental awards are selected by the faculty within the department.  To receive consideration for one of these departmental awards, a student must meet the following criteria; 1) must be a graduating senior; 2) must have earned at Flagler College a minimum of 56 credit hours (45 credit hours for Education majors) carrying letter grades, not Pass/Fail; 3) must have maintained a grade point average of 3.4 or better in courses taken in the department; and 4) must have maintained a cumulative grade point average of 3.2 or above.

 

Early Participation in Commencement Ceremonies

Students who have not completed all the necessary degree requirements but who expect to complete their degree requirements by the end of the semester immediately following the commencement ceremony may petition to participate in the ceremony, if they satisfy all the following conditions:

 

  1. The student must have completed at least 110 semester hours and must need no more than 10 additional semester hours to satisfy the degree requirements.
  2. The student must have completed all other degree requirements, including testing and other requirements for his or her primary major.
  3. The student must have a minimum 2.3 cumulative grade point average; education majors must have a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point average.
  4. The student must attempt to complete all degree requirements by the end of the semester immediately following the ceremony, as evidenced by registering for the required coursework.

 

A student who meets these conditions and who wishes to participate in the commencement ceremony must submit his or her request in writing to the Dean at least six weeks prior to the end of the semester.

 

Students who walk early will receive their diploma at the conclusion of the semester in which their final coursework was taken or program requirements were met.  Official transcripts indicating their degree completion are typically available within three weeks of the conclusion of the semester.  Students who walk early will not be recognized as honor graduates during the commencement ceremony.

 

President's List and Dean's List

The President's List and the Dean's List are compiled in recognition of students achieving a certain standard of academic excellence.  To qualify for the Dean's List a student must complete at least 12 semester hours of letter-grade courses with a 3.4 grade point average and with no grade less than C- for the semester.  Students who earn a 4.0 grade point average with at least 12 semester hours of graded credit are named to the President's List.

 

Block Scheduling

Flagler College – Tallahassee schedules students in blocks, moving students through sequences of classes.  Class sections and instructors are scheduled by the institution, thereby eliminating the need to "cancel" class sections that do not "make," deny students a seat when classes have filled to capacity, or delay a graduation date because of schedule conflicts.  Block scheduling does not allow for the accommodation of individual preferences with regard to class times, class sequencing, faculty selection, or other personal requests for those students who want to remain in full-time status. 

 

In light of the block scheduling at Flagler College-Tallahassee, a withdrawal, drop, or unsatisfactory grade from a course may result in future scheduling difficulties, and a possible delay in the student's expected graduation date and continuing financial aid. Therefore, students will be required to meet with their academic advisors to review the impact of the event.

 

Schedule Changes

Subject to the approval of the Department Chair, a student may add courses during the first week of each semester.  For information relating to the deadlines for dropping courses without academic penalty, please refer to the Academic Calendar for students.  The calendars also reflect the dates in which a student may drop a course and receive a grade of W, as well as the dates that students, unless officially withdrawn from the College, will automatically earn a WF.

 

In light of the block scheduling at Flagler College-Tallahassee, a change in the student's schedule may result in future scheduling difficulties.  A student should weigh possible changes very carefully, in that a change in schedule might well lead to a delay in the completion of the program and the graduation date.  Therefore students will be required to meet with their academic advisors to review the impact of dropping a course.

 

Registration for Continuing Students

The Academic Calendar indicates dates and times for registration.  At registration, students are given an opportunity to review the schedule of classes prepared for them by the Assistant Registrar, note any changes or adjustments that must be made, and sign the schedule indicating their approval and acceptance of the proposed schedule.  Any student who fails to attend one of the scheduled registration meetings, and has not made prior arrangements with the Assistant Registrar, will have his or her schedule (and subsequent seat in class) cancelled.  The student who does not attend registration will incur a $50.00 late registration fee if he or she decides at a later date to attend classes the following semester.

 

Student Evaluations

The evaluative process at Flagler College places emphasis on all aspects of the student's academic performance.  Class attendance, participation, reports, projects, and test grades, among other evaluations, are considered in determining final grades.  Continuous evaluative efforts, facilitated by a favorable faculty‑student ratio, serve to identify learning deficiencies before the end of the course, thus enabling instructors to provide individual assistance when needed.  Comprehensive examinations may be given in major fields of concentration during the final semester of the senior year and/or during the final examination period.

 

Final Examinations

In the day program, a period for final examinations is scheduled from Monday through Friday during the last week of the semester.  Evening program exams are scheduled during the last class meeting of each course.  The Dean or designee prepares the final examination schedule and distributes it to faculty and students at the beginning of each semester.  Faculty are required to adhere to the published schedule, and students must take the exams at the published times on campus in scheduled assigned rooms.

 

Exit Assessment

The College requires that all graduating seniors, during their final semester, participate in assessment procedures as defined for their majors.  This assessment may be in the form of departmental, state, or national exams; surveys; senior papers; portfolios; final projects; or other types of assessment.  Each academic department determines the particular form and time of these assessments.  Satisfaction of exit assessment requirements is necessary for graduation.

 

Grade Correction

Any errors in grades, including omissions, must be reported by the student to the instructor or Department Chair.  A "Grade Correction Authorization" form may be obtained from the Assistant Registrar's office and must be completed and signed by the appropriate faculty member.  No corrections, additions or changes will be made unless grade errors are reported to the Assistant Registrar within the first two weeks of the semester following the term in which the course was taken.  Failure to report a grade error within the time specified above will result in the original grade being filed on a permanent basis.

 

Grading of Academic Work

Final grades are available to students, via the online portal. campus website, at the conclusion of each semester and are recorded on the student's permanent record.  The grading system is as follows: 

 

Grade

Meaning

Quality Points

Numerical Equivalent

A

Superior

4.0

93-100

A-

 

3.7

90-92

B+

 

3.3

87-89

B

Good

3.0

83-86

B-

 

2.7

80-82

C+

 

2.3

77-79

C

Satisfactory

2.0

73-76

C-

 

1.7

70-72

D+

 

1.3

67-69

D

Passing

1.0

60-66

F

Failure

0.0

59 and lower

I

Incomplete

 

 

W

Withdrew

 

 

NG

No Grade

 

 

 

For the purpose of computing a student's grade point average, 4 quality points are given for each semester hour of A, 3.7 for each hour of A-, 3.3 for each hour of B+, 3 for each hour of B, 2.7 for each hour of B-, 2.3 for each hour of C+, 2 for each hour of C, 1.7 for each hour of C-, 1.3 for each hour of D+, and 1 for each hour of D.  A grade of F, WF, or I is counted as zero.  The grade point average is calculated by dividing the total hours attempted into the total quality points.

 

  1. Grade Documentation

At the end of each academic semester, all instructors will submit to the Assistant Registrar written or electronic grade documentation for all students.  If an instructor is no longer employed by Flagler College-Tallahassee, the student grade documentation will be used in the event of a grade appeal.  The grade documentation will be maintained for one year then destroyed.  Grade documentation for education majors will be maintained for three years.  Education portfolios will be maintained for five years as will documentation of the education internship.

 

  1. Change of Grade

Any errors in grades, including omissions, must be reported by the student to the Assistant Registrar.  A "Grade Correction Authorization" form may be obtained from the Assistant Registrar's Office and must be completed and signed by the appropriate faculty member, the Department Chair, the Dean, and Assistant Registrar.  No corrections, additions, or changes will be made unless grade errors are reported to the Assistant Registrar within the first four weeks of the semester following the semester in which the course was taken.  Failure to report a grade error within the time specified above will result in the original grade being recorded on a permanent basis.

 

  1.  Incomplete Grade

A grade of "I" (Incomplete) is assigned by the instructor when a student is unable to complete a course due to extenuating circumstances and when all requirements can be completed in a short time following the end of a course.  In the absence of justifiable cause, an incomplete grade will not be assigned.

 

In order to receive a grade of "Incomplete," a student or instructor must initiate the process by completing a "Request for Incomplete Grade" form.  The form is available in the Assistant Registrar's Office, and it must be signed by the student and the instructor.

 

The student is responsible for making arrangements with the instructor to complete the requirements for the course and to remove the incomplete grade within eight weeks following the course for which the incomplete grade was received.  The eight-week period is the maximum time allowed, and the instructor should establish an earlier date, whenever possible.  Students who fail to complete the course requirements within the prescribed period will automatically receive a grade of "F" for the course.

 

Incomplete grades are included in the calculation of a student's grade point average.Upon completion of the course requirements, the incomplete grade will be removed, and the final course grade will be used to compute the student's grade point average.

 

  1. Appeal of Grade

As a general rule, faculty decisions regarding academic matters within their purview are not subject to appeal, unless the student can present evidence indicating mitigating circumstances of a substantial nature.  In an effort to minimize such occasions, it is anticipated that members of the faculty will provide students with adequate explanation of course requirements and grading standards.  It is expected that attendance requirements and other standards pertaining to classroom deportment will be explicit.  Additionally, grading procedures should be designed to keep students informed of their relative standing.

 

A student has the right to appeal a course grade, provided there is evidence that the grade is an inaccurate assessment of the student's work or that it is inconsistent with stated grading criteria.  The student must first consult with the instructor to clarify the grading method used and the rationale for the grade issued.  If the matter cannot be resolved between the student and the instructor, then the student should consult with the Department Chair.  The program Department Chair, in turn, will consult with the instructor, and then inform the student of his or her decision.

 

If a student wishes to appeal the decision of the Department Chair, he or she must submit a formal written appeal to the Dean.  Such an appeal must be submitted within two weeks of the beginning of the next semester and should contain information pertinent to the appeal.  The Dean may dismiss a grade appeal for lack of merit, render a final decision in the matter, or may appoint a faculty committee to review the appeal and to consider all related evidence.  If a committee is appointed, the committee's recommendation will be forwarded to the Dean, who may accept or reject the recommendation.  In either case, the decision of the Dean is final. 

 

If an instructor is no longer employed by the College, the student grade documentation will be used in the event of a grade appeal.  The grade documentation will be maintained for one year and then destroyed.  Education portfolios will be maintained for five years as will documentation of the education internship.

 

When a student wishes to appeal some other disciplinary action (e.g., expulsion from class) taken by a faculty member, the student must first contact the faculty member and obtain a thorough explanation of the reasons for the faculty member's action.  If, in the student's opinion, the reasons provided are inadequate or the action taken is too severe, the student should then contact the Department Chair.  The Department Chair may counsel with the faculty member and the student in an effort to resolve the matter.  The Department Chair, however, is not authorized to require that a student be reinstated in a class; rather, the Department Chair should submit a recommendation to the Dean.  The Dean may rule in the matter or schedule a hearing with the faculty member and the student. In either case, the decision of the Dean is final.

 

  1. Repeat Courses

Students may repeat a course in which a grade of "D," "F," or "WF" was earned to improve their grade point averages.While a record of both courses will remain on the transcript, only the grade assigned for the repeated course will be computed into the student's cumulative grade point average.The most recent repeat grade recorded will be used in calculating the grade point average.Students who repeat a course in which a grade of "F" or "WF" was originally earned will receive credit hours for the repeat course, provided that a passing grade is earned.Students who repeat a course in which a grade of "D" was originally earned will not receive any credit hours for the repeat course, since credit hours have already been awarded.

 

Students who earn a grade of "D," "F," or "WF" in a course at Flagler College may not repeat that course at another institution for purposes of transferring the grade or the credit back to Flagler CollegeNo Flagler College course may be attempted more than three times; withdrawals are counted as attempts.  Students may appeal to the Dean to be considered for an additional attempt at a course.

 

In light of the block scheduling at Flagler College-Tallahassee, an unsatisfactory grade in a course may result in future scheduling difficulties, and a possible delay in the student's expected graduation date and continuing financial aid.  Therefore, students will be required to meet with their academic advisors to review the impact of the unsatisfactory grade.

 

A student receiving financial aid who considers repeating a course should contact the Office of Financial Aid to determine if he or she will earn sufficient hours for continued eligibility of that financial aid.

 

Transfer Credits from Another Institution

Applicants transferring from another institution must be in good standing and must be eligible to return to the college or university previously attended.  Students who have earned the A.A. or A.S. degree from Tallahassee Community College, but who are not in good standing at a later transfer college or university, may be considered for probationary admission by the Admissions Committee.  Transfer applicants from four-year institutions may receive a maximum of 75 semester hours of credit hours awarded.  Recipients of the Associate of Arts (A.A.) Degree are generally admitted at the junior level; however, applicants who transfer from community/junior colleges will be allowed no more than 64 semester hours of credit toward the completion of degree requirements at Flagler.

 

Transfer credits will generally be granted for courses in which a grade of "C" or better was earned from regionally accredited institutions.  Grades are not transferable; hence, quality points earned for transfer credits are not used in computing a student's GPA at Flagler.  Students who have successfully completed the requirements for an A.A. degree may transfer up to three courses in which a "D" grade was earned, provided the total number of transfer credits does not exceed 64 semester hours.  In accordance with the Independent Colleges and Universities of Florida (ICUF) Articulation Agreement, Flagler College, as a member of ICUF, provides some basic guarantees to transfer students who have earned an Associate of Arts (A.A.) degree from any member institution of the State of Florida public university system.  This guarantee includes the transfer of 60 credits to be applied toward the awarding of the baccalaureate degree and completion of the general education requirements at Flagler College.  No grade below "C" in any education course is accepted. This is inclusive of all general education courses required for the major.

 

The amount of transfer credit and advanced standing allowed by the College will be determined by the Assistant Registrar.  In some instances, the Office of Academic Affairs and/or department chairs are consulted prior to awarding transfer credit.  Transfer students are responsible for submitting all official transcripts, Caribbean Advanced Proficiency Examination (CAPE), CLEP, International Baccalaureate (IB), Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE), or Advanced Placement test scores, and for confirming their level of advanced standing prior to registering for classes at Flagler College-Tallahassee.

 

In light of the block scheduling at Flagler College-Tallahassee, transfer credits accepted in required major coursework may result in future scheduling difficulties.  A student should weigh applying for transfer credits very carefully, in that a change in schedule might well lead to a delay in completion of the program and the graduation date.

 

Transient Transfer Credits from Another Institution

Flagler students who wish to take courses at another institution must complete the Application for Transient Study and must receive approval from the Assistant Registrar, before enrolling as a transient student at another college or university.  Application forms are available in the Assistant Registrar's office.  Students who fail to receive prior approval before enrolling at another institution will be denied transfer credit.

 

Flagler College limits the number of hours a student may earn at another college or university after that student has enrolled at Flagler.  Students may earn up to 9 hours of credit from another institution.  Seniors must complete their final 30 semester hours of

credit at Flagler College.  With the exception of prerequisite or general education requirements, students may not earn credit for courses taken at a two-year college after they have earned 60 or more semester hours.

 

Registering for Courses at Another Flagler College Location

This policy prescribes procedures that students are to follow if they wish to take courses offered by Flagler College at another location.  From time to time, students enrolled in Flagler College (St. Augustine) may request permission to register for a course (or courses) offered at Flagler College-Tallahassee. In like manner, Flagler College-Tallahassee students may request permission to register for a course (or courses) being offered at Flagler College (St. Augustine).  It is anticipated that most of these requests will be for enrollment in the summer terms on the respective campuses.

 

Procedures:

  1. Student submits request in writing to the Registrar (St. Augustine) or the Assistant Registrar (Tallahassee).
  2. Registrar (St. Augustine) or the Assistant Registrar (Tallahassee) provides student with a Flagler College Alternate Campus Transfer Form.
  3. Student obtains required signatures from Department Chair (St. Augustine) or Department Chair (Tallahassee) to ensure that course will meet the requirements of the major.
  4. Student obtains required signatures from Academic Affairs (and the Dean (Tallahassee).
  5. The student returns the Flagler College Alternate Campus Transfer Form to the Office of the Registrar (St. Augustine) or the Assistant Registrar (Tallahassee). The home campus forwards the request to the receiving campus, who reviews the request to determine if there is space available in the requested course.
  6. If space is available, the receiving campus sends a letter of approval to the student, with a copy to the home campus, noting the dates, meeting times, and location of the class meetings. The student is also notified of the applicable tuition charge, the registration deadline, and the date on which tuition payment and/or deposit are due.
  7. The student will be required to confirm his/her intent to enroll in the course and to pay applicable charges as specified by the Registrar (St. Augustine) or Assistant Registrar (Tallahassee) and the Business Services Office personnel at the receiving campus. 
  8. It will be the responsibility of the student to discuss arrangements for financial aid with Financial Aid personnel at his/her home campus.

 

Course Load

The quantity unit of credit at Flagler College is the semester hour.  A minimum of 12 semester hours is required for full-time status.  Full-time course load for students enrolled in the day program is 15 hours and 12-15 hours for students enrolled in the evening program.  Students may not register for a course overload without approval of the Department Chair.  Normally, students must have a earned a minimum grade point average of 3.0 for two semesters preceding the semester in which they wish to register for a course overload.

 

Florida Teacher Certification Exam Requirements for Education Majors

In order to continue in a Flagler College Education Program, all education majors must pass a basic skills entrance exam prior to the third semester of coursework.  Students are strongly encouraged to take the General Knowledge (GK) portion of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam prior to enrolling at Flagler College.  

If a student does not take the GK test prior to enrolling at Flagler, he or she will be required to take the exam in the first semester of coursework.  If a student does not pass all subtests of the exam, he or she will be required to complete a mandatory remediation program during the second semester of coursework.  Students who do not attempt the exam during the first semester will be re-enrolled in EDU 241 during the second semester of coursework.   

Flagler will accept only the General Knowledge Test (GK) as the entrance exam.  Students who have not provided official proof of having passed this exam at the conclusion of their second semester of Flagler coursework will be placed on leave from the program until such proof is provided. 

 

All education majors will be required to produce official passing test scores on all sections of the Florida Teacher Certification Exam (FTCE) prior to being assigned an internship site.  These sections include the Professional Education (PED) Test, all applicable Subject Area Exams (SAE), and all sections of the General Knowledge Exam (GK), which includes Math, English, Reading, and Essay.  Official test scores are posted electronically and the student is responsible for printing score reports and submitting them to the Department Secretary.  Contracting for internship placements occurs months before a semester begins; therefore, official passing test scores must be submitted by October 15 of each year for spring semester interns, and March 15 of each year for fall semester interns.

 

POLICIES, RULES, AND REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO STUDENT CONDUCT, SAFETY AND SECURITY

 

TCC Code of Conduct

The TCC Student Conduct Code shall apply to students participating in programs delivered through TCC.  The TCC Student Conduct Code is defined in the TCC catalog, the Student Handbook, and on TCC's website.  Flagler College also requires students enrolled in its programs and courses to adhere to additional standards set forth by Flagler College as outlined in the Flagler College-Tallahassee Bulletin.

 

Identification Cards

All students who have been financially cleared can have a student identification card created following Orientation.  This photo identification card is required for all students. It is non‑transferable and should be carried by the student at all times.  This card is required for identification purposes in the TCC library, Lifetime Sports complex at TCC athletic or social events, and will need to be re-validated each semester.

 

Students will be charged $10.00 by TCC for replacement of a lost or misplaced identification card.  A new card may be obtained at the TCC Police Department.

 

Email Accounts

Students will be provided a flagler.edu email account with a password and log-in within the first three weeks of their initial semester at Flagler College-Tallahassee.  To allow students access to TCC computers, student WiFi, and campus alerts, students also receive  a TCC email account.  Students are responsible for remembering their log-in and password and for regularly checking their email account for messages from Flagler faculty or staff.  Staff will only communicate with students using their Flagler.edu email addresses, and faculty communication regarding grades and other confidential or sensitive matters will occur using TCC email addresses.

 

Alcoholic Beverages

The use or possession of alcoholic beverages on the campus by students or their guests is prohibited and is grounds for suspension from the College.  Students are expected to comply with municipal, state, and federal laws pertaining to the possession and use of alcoholic beverages are subject to college disciplinary action regardless of the location of such incidents.  Alcoholic beverage containers, including shot glasses and bottle caps in automobiles are in conflict with the College's policy prohibiting consumption of alcohol on campus.  When such containers are found in the automobile, it will be assumed that the alcohol was consumed on the campus, and students involved will be charged with possession of alcohol.  Physical evidence of any container of an alcoholic beverage (whether empty, full, or partially full) will constitute sufficient evidence in an automobile to find a student (or students) guilty of possession of alcoholic beverages on campus.

 

Students found guilty of driving under the influence of alcoholic beverages (DUI) are subject to suspension.  In the case of formal charges filed by a law enforcement agency, the College is not required to await legal adjudication of the case.  If deemed advisable, the College may proceed with a disciplinary hearing on the basis of the evidence available.

 

Destruction of Property

Students responsible for destruction of or damage to personal or private property are subject to disciplinary action and will be held financially liable.

 

Disorderly Conduct

From the time a student applies to the Flagler College-Tallahassee until the date at which the student's enrollment is officially terminated, the College reserves the right to take cognizance of any conduct on the part of the student that may disqualify him or her from initial enrollment or from continuing enrollment for successive semesters.

 

Initial enrollment may be denied to a prospective student who violates any law, statute, or ordinance or who engages in any behavior that would constitute a violation of the College's standards of conduct.

 

Once enrolled, students are accountable for their conduct both on and off campus.  This accountability applies not only during the academic semester but also during vacations and periods between semesters.  Accordingly, the violation of any law, statute or ordinance, the violation of college rules, or conduct that reflects discredit upon the institution is subject to review and appropriate disciplinary action, regardless of whether it occurs off-campus or between academic semesters.  

 

At the conclusion of each semester, the College administration will review the academic and disciplinary records of those students who, in the opinion of the designated college official, have failed to make appropriate adjustment to Flagler College and whose continuing enrollment is in question.  Any student on suspension will be subject to such review prior to re-enrollment.  The College reserves the right to deny, on the basis of the review, continuing or re-enrollment to any student whose presence or conduct is deemed to be contrary to the best interest of the institution.  If, on the basis of the above-mentioned review, a student is not charged with any disciplinary action and has submitted an advanced deposit but is denied re-enrollment, the advanced deposit will be returned.

 

Disrespect

Flagler College students are expected to be courteous, polite, and respectful toward faculty, staff, administration, guests, and other students.  When a student is reported for being disrespectful, rude, or discourteous, severe disciplinary action will be initiated.  The policy applies to all forms of communication including in-person, email, phone, social media, and the like.

 

Faculty-Student Relationships

Faculty relationships with students shall be based upon the highest professional principles and shall contribute to the general well-being of the students and the institution.  Actions that impair the professional relationship between a faculty member and a student are detrimental to the entire program.

 

Appropriate friendships and associations are encouraged.  The maintenance of appropriate and necessary professional relationships must take precedence over social relationships and must be preserved, if necessary, by curtailing actions that would impair the standards and objectives of the College.

 

Falsification of Records

A student who has withheld or has given false information on his or her application for admission or readmission is subject to suspension or expulsion.

 

Firearms, Fireworks, Explosives

The possession or use of firearms, parts of a firearm or weapon, fireworks of any description, explosive devices, or any dangerous weapon is prohibited on college premises or at any college-sponsored function.  Dangerous weapons shall include but not be limited to: swords, dirks, knives, brass knuckles, blackjacks, or any other instrument deemed to be a weapon (including toy guns and weapons).

 

Fireworks/explosives and dangerous weapons are prohibited under Florida law.  They may not be brought on campus under any circumstances.  Violators of this regulation will be subject to suspension or expulsion from Flagler College.

 

Due to recent changes in Florida law, students should be aware of the details of Florida's "bring your gun to work" law as it pertains to Flagler College.  The "Preservation and Protection of the Right to Keep and Bear Arms in Motor Vehicles Act of 2008" (§ 790.251, Fla. Stat. (2008) went into effect July 1, 2008.

 

Flagler College is exempt from this law as an educational institution [as defined in § 790.115, Fla. Stat. (2006)]. No students, staff, or faculty members (including contract workers, interns, volunteers, and guests) are allowed to bring a firearm to the Flagler College campus or keep a firearm locked inside their vehicle in any Flagler-owned or leased parking lot.  Active sworn law enforcement personnel, however, are allowed to carry firearms (concealed or not) at all times.  For more information on this law and the full text of the Florida Statute, see this legislation online at www.flsenate.gov under SB1130.

 

Bullying and Hazing

It is the policy of Flagler College to maintain a learning and work environment that is free from bullying and hazing of any type.  It shall be a violation of college policy for any student, instructor, faculty member, staff member, administrator, volunteer, campus guest, or third-party (i.e. contracted vendor) to bully or haze any student, employee, or other member of the college community on any college property, at any college function, event or activity, or through the use of any electronic or digital technology, whether or not such use occurs on college property.

 

The College will act promptly to investigate all instances of bullying or hazing, take appropriate steps to protect individuals from further bullying or hazing that comes to its attention, and, if it is determined that a policy violation has occurred, take appropriate action reasonably calculated to end the behavior and to appropriately discipline any student, instructor, faculty member, staff member, administrator, or other employee, volunteer, campus guest, or third-party (i.e. contracted vendor) and/or take other appropriate action reasonably calculated to end the behavior.  This disciplinary action could possibly include termination of an employee or expulsion of a student who has violated the policy.

  

Notice of Nondiscrimination

As a recipient of Federal funds, Flagler College is required to comply with Title IX of the Higher Education Amendments of 1972, 20 U.S.C. § 1681 et seq. ("Title IX"), which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs or activities.  Sexual Misconduct (as defined by the Flagler College Student Sexual Misconduct Policy and Procedures, available at www.flagler.edu/[studentsexualmisconductpolicy) is a form of sexual discrimination prohibited by Title IX.  Inquiries concerning the application of Title IX may be referred to Flagler College's Title IX Coordinator or to the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights. Flagler College's Title IX Coordinator is Jessica Kobryn. Ms. Kobryn may be contacted by phone at 904-826-8553 or by email at jkobryn@flagler.edu.

 

Non-Prescription and Controlled Substances

In accordance with Flagler College's commitment to academic excellence and the belief that the use of mind‑altering drugs leads to impaired judgment and reduced achievement, the possession or use of any illegal drug is prohibited.  No student may be in possession of, deliver, dispense, distribute, administer, manufacture, or wholesale any controlled substance, including marijuana, narcotics, hallucinogens, and other chemical analog or drug‑related paraphernalia prohibited by state or Federal Drug Laws.  Any student who violates this regulation is subject to disciplinary action up to and including suspension, dismissal or expulsion.

 

Privacy of Student Records  

The College makes every attempt to enforce the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974.  This regulation, as it applies to institutions of higher learning, ensures that students have access to certain records that pertain to them.  It prohibits others, except faculty members or administrators who have a "need to know" and parents who claim their student as a dependent for tax purposes, from access to the student's records, unless the student signs a waiver.

  1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within 45 days of the day the College receives a request for access.  Students should submit to the Assistant Registrar, the Dean of Academic Affairs, the Dean of Student Services, the Director of Business Services, the Director of Financial Aid, the head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect and purpose(s) for inspection.  If the records are not maintained by the college official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.  The appropriate college official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected.

 

  1. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading.  Students may ask the College to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading.  They should write the college official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.  If the College decides not to amend the record as requested, the College will notify the student of

the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment.  Additional Information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

 

  1. The right to consent to disclosure of personally-identifiable information contained in the student's education record, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent.  One exception which permits disclosure without consent is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests.  A school official is a person employed by the College in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including campus safety and security personnel and health services staff); a person with whom the College has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; a student serving on an official committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks.  A school official has legitimate educational interest, if the official needs to review an educational record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities.

 

  1. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the College to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA is: 

 

Family Policy Compliance Office

U.S. Department of Education

400 Maryland Avenue, SW

Washington, D.C. 20202‑4605

 

Directory information may be released by the College without the student's written consent.  Directory information may include student name, address, email address, telephone number, date of birth, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, the most recent previous educational institution attended, photographs, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, and the height and weight of athletes.

 

A student has the right to refuse permission to release any or all directory information without the student's prior written consent.  The student, at the time of registration, must request in writing that the directory information not be released.  The student must notify the Assistant Registrar in writing each academic year of enrollment to deny the release of information.  To deny the release of information, including photographs in recognized activities, programs, services, and sports, the student must notify in writing the Assistant Registrar each academic year.

 

Readmitted Students

Former students, whose enrollment at Flagler College has been voluntarily or involuntarily interrupted, including academic suspension or dismissal, must petition the Dean in writing for readmission to the College.  The request for readmission should include reasons for leaving Flagler and for wanting to re-enroll and must be received at least eight weeks prior to the start of the semester in which the student wants to return.  All requests must include current contact information and the semester for which readmission is being requested. 

 

Former students who have attended another college or university for at least one semester must be eligible to re-enroll at that institution, if they desire to return to Flagler.  Students who have attended another institution for at least one semester must have earned a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better since last attending Flagler to be eligible for readmission.  Official transcripts from the institution(s) attended must be submitted to the Assistant Registrar.

 

In some instances, an on-campus interview may be required.  Any student who withdraws from the College for reasons of illness must have medical clearance from the attending physician prior to readmission.  Any student who applies for readmission must be cleared by the Office of Business Services, the Campus Dean, the Department Chair, and the Assistant Registrar. 

 

Students seeking readmission will be required to submit a new enrollment confirmation form and advanced deposit.  Students may appeal in writing to the Dean to waive the advance deposit.

 

Smoking Policy

All facilities (buildings and grounds) owned or operated by TCC are designed as non-smoking areas unless indicated otherwise.  Faculty, staff, students and visitors who choose to use tobacco products may do so only in areas designated for smoking.  It is the responsibility of the individual to properly dispose of tobacco waste products.  This policy includes all tobacco products, including products such as smokeless tobacco.

 

Student Complaints

Students who wish to file a formal complaint must do so in writing.  A written student complaint should be addressed to the Campus Dean.  The complaint will be acknowledged within five days, and a copy of the written communication is to be filed with the Campus Dean. The Campus Dean shall subsequently send a memorandum outlining the action taken to address the complaint.  The Assistant to the President is responsible for receiving and logging student complaints and for ensuring that complaints are properly processed.  If the student is not satisfied with the action taken or with the proposed resolution, he or she may appeal the matter to the Chancellor of the College; however, such appeal must be based upon evidence of the neglect or violation of college policies or procedures by a member of the staff or faculty.  The Chancellor may elect to meet with the student and with the person(s) to whom the complaint is directed; however, the Chancellor's decision is final.

 

Vehicles and Parking Regulations

Students with automobiles must provide evidence of vehicle registration to the College Administration during orientation.  All vehicles must be registered with the College's Administration and must exhibit a College parking decal in the lower right-hand corner of the rear window.  Reverse-In parking is prohibited on TCC's campus.

 

Violations of Local, State and Federal Laws

The College, upon learning of a student's arrest, will inquire into the nature of the charge and note any violations of college regulations.  These violations may result in disciplinary action.  In cases where the safety or welfare of others may be jeopardized, the College may suspend or expel prior to legal adjudication of the charges.  In such instances the case may be referred to the appropriate committee for review and recommendation.  However, the student may be summarily suspended pending a hearing.

 

Withdrawal from the Program

A student who finds it necessary to withdraw from Flagler College-Tallahassee must complete an official withdrawal form, which can be obtained from the Flagler office.  When a student leaves the College without following the proper procedures, his or her permanent record is marked as an "administrative withdrawal."  Students who do not adhere to the prescribed procedures for withdrawing are subject to failing grades in all courses. 

 

Disciplinary Procedures  

The College has high standards of personal conduct and ethics.  These standards are embodied in rules, regulations, and policies, which the College has adopted to maintain order on campus, to promote student safety and welfare, and to further its institutional aims and values.  They limit some activities and behavior that is detrimental to the orderly operation of the institution and to the pursuit of its goals.  All students are charged with knowledge of and compliance with these rules as stated in this Bulletin as well as in the Catalog, which can be found on the Flagler website www.flagler.edu.

 

The College's disciplinary policies and procedures are explained below.  The student's rights under the college disciplinary procedures are not as extensive as a defendant's in a criminal prosecution in a court of law or a student's due process rights in disciplinary proceedings at public institutions.  Rather, they are intended to provide an expeditious, administratively practical but fundamentally fair process for resolving contested disciplinary cases in the context of a private, traditional, academic institution, where the institutional interest in upholding high standards of conduct, maintaining order on campus and protecting the health, safety, and welfare of the student body must be balanced against the rights of the accused.  By enrolling at the Flagler College-Tallahassee, students accept the college disciplinary process as fundamentally fair and agree to abide by its disciplinary policies and procedures, as stated in this Bulletin and in the Catalog as they may be amended from time to time.

 

Review and Referral

Disciplinary complaints are reviewed by the Dean for appropriate disposition.  As a rule, if there is a possibility that a student may be suspended, dismissed or expelled from Flagler College-Tallahassee, the case is deemed to involve a major infraction.  In such cases, the student is given a choice between administrative disposition or hearing before a disciplinary committee.  The Dean may dispose of some complaints without formal proceedings by issuing a verbal warning or written reprimand.

 

Administrative Disposition

If the student charged with a major violation does not contest the charge, the student has the option of administrative disposition by the Dean.  By choosing this option, the student waives the right to contest the charges at a disciplinary hearing and the other rights afforded in the hearing process.  The Dean takes such disciplinary action as may be appropriate, and his/her decision is not subject to appeal.

 

The hearing procedures listed below do not apply when a student does not contest the charges and accepts administrative disposition by the Dean.

 

College Disciplinary Committee

A college disciplinary committee may be appointed to review cases involving major violations and to make recommendations as to the guilt or innocence and, if appropriate, as to what disciplinary action should be taken.

 

Generally, cases involving the possibility of suspension, dismissal, or expulsion are referred to a college disciplinary committee for hearing.  However, the Dean will conduct a hearing when cases are initiated during the last two weeks of the fall or spring semester, or at any time during the summer session(s), or during the vacations or breaks between semesters.  For purpose of this provision, a case is deemed to be initiated when the Dean gives the student formal written notice of the charges.

 

College Continuation Committee

In cases involving sensitive or confidential information in which the student's continuing enrollment is in question, the Dean may appoint a faculty/administrative ad hoc committee to hear the case and recommend appropriate action.

 

Matters referred to the committee may be of a disciplinary nature and also may involve problems related to the social or emotional adjustment of a student.  The committee may recommend such action as probation, suspension, dismissal, expulsion, voluntary withdrawal, or other appropriate action.

 

Disciplinary Hearing Procedures

Under the foregoing guidelines, a college disciplinary committee, the College Continuation Committee, and the Dean all have occasion to conduct disciplinary hearings in contested cases involving major violations.  The basic procedures in such cases are as follows:

           

  1. The student is given written notice of the charges.
  2. The student is notified of the date, time and place of the hearing.
  3. The student has the opportunity to respond to the charges and to present evidence and witnesses on his or her behalf.  However, evidence may be rejected if it is deemed immaterial, cumulative or otherwise unworthy of consideration.
  4. In hearings conducted by a college disciplinary committee, the committee makes a recommendation as to whether College rules and regulations have been violated. The recommendations of the committee are forwarded to the Dean, who determines whether College rules and regulations have been violated and, if appropriate, takes disciplinary action, after due consideration of the committtee's findings and recommendations.
  5. In hearings before the College Continuation Committee, the Committee makes recommendations as to the student's adjustment to and continuing enrollment at the College.  The Committee may make such other recommendations as may be appropriate, whether College rules and regulations have been violated and disciplinary action where rules infractions are involved. 
  6. In hearings conducted by the Dean, the Dean hears the evidence and reaches a decision in the case without committee involvement.
  7. The Dean notifies the student in writing of the disposition of the charges and any disciplinary action.
  8. The student has the right to appeal any adverse decision to the College Chancellor.  Such appeals must be in writing within 48 hours after the notice of disposition is delivered to the student.  The decision of the College Chancellor on such an appeal is final, conclusive and binding.
  9. All hearings are closed to the public.  The content of all hearings is kept confidential by committee members, and the names of those involved will not be made public.  The results may be published in the college newspaper by case number designation only and without the disclosure of personal identity.
  10. Flagler College reserves the right to summarily suspend a student prior to hearing when such action is deemed necessary.  The student must leave campus as instructed.  The student will be notified of the hearing date.
  11. The College reserves the right to modify the foregoing procedures in response to the exigencies and circumstances of a particular case.

 

The College endeavors to follow the foregoing procedures in contested disciplinary cases.  It should be understood, however, that it is not intended that college disciplinary boards and officials adhere to the procedures of a court of law.  Representation by counsel, confrontation and cross-examination of witnesses, discovery and appeals beyond the College Chancellor are not allowed.  The focus is not process and procedure, but rather whether or not the student has committed a serious violation of the rules of conduct.  Accordingly, it is unlikely that a disciplinary decision will be reversed on appeal by the College Chancellor because of procedural technicalities unless it appears they resulted in the student being found guilty of an offense he or she did not commit.

 

Types of Disciplinary Action

There are five general types of disciplinary action which may be imposed by the College:

 

Reprimands:  Reprimands may be issued by the Dean verbally or in writing.  A record of a verbal warning or a copy of a written reprimand is placed in a Student Affairs folder in the Office of the Dean and may be included in the records for any subsequent proceedings of related or unrelated offenses.

 

Probation: There are two types of probations — General and Restrictive.  Probation usually involves constructive guidelines intended to motivate the student to comply with college regulations and to promote both academic success and social adjustment.

  1. General Disciplinary Probation

When a violation requires more than a letter of reprimand but does not warrant annotation on a student's official transcripts, the student will be placed on General Disciplinary Probation.

  1. Restrictive Disciplinary Probation

Restrictive Disciplinary Probation results in the loss of good standing and becomes a matter of record.  Restrictive Disciplinary Probation may include, but is not limited to, campus restrictions and activity restrictions.  Restrictions are in effect for the stated probationary period.

 

Suspensions:  A student involved in a serious violation of college rules or regulations or in repeated incidents of misconduct may be suspended.  The length of the suspension period will be clearly defined and may extend from a number of days to a number of semesters.  A suspended student may be issued a Trespass Warning by Campus Police and will be prohibited from being on the college campus except by scheduled appointment for official business.  A review of the student's records will be undertaken before re-enrollment is approved.  Suspension will become a part of the student's record until the period of suspension is over.

 

Dismissal:  In instances wherein the College does not wish to specify a definite period of suspension, the term "dismissal" rather than "suspension" will be applied.  A dismissal entails the possibility of appeal and readmission to the College under appropriate circumstances at a later date.  A review of the student's records will be undertaken before re-enrollment is approved.

 

Expulsion:  When a violation is so severe that the College will not allow the student to remain enrolled or be readmitted, the student will be expelled.  When a student has been expelled from the College for disciplinary reasons, a full report will be placed in the student's permanent record.

 

Finality

Flagler College grants students the privilege of attending the institution on the condition that they accept and abide by its disciplinary policies and procedures.  It is the policy of the College to internally resolve all disciplinary cases involving violations of the rules of conduct.  As stated above, in contested cases involving major infractions, a student has the right to appeal to the College Chancellor.  The Chancellor's decision on that appeal is final, conclusive and binding.  A disciplinary decision is not subject to any other appeal, judicial review or collateral attack in court.  By accepting the privilege of attending Flagler College-Tallahassee, students agree to abide by any college disciplinary decision against them, subject only to the prescribed appeal to the College Chancellor.  Students waive any right to redress in court and agree and covenant not to sue the College on account of disciplinary action.

 

Financial Refund

In all cases involving suspension, dismissal or expulsion, no financial refunds will be made by the College, and the student's account is due and payable.

 

Flagler College-Tallahassee General Education Program

 

Students at Flagler College are required to complete specific groups of courses from a variety of fields to ensure exposure to different ideas and ways of thinking.

 

All students are required to complete two courses in English Composition (ENG 101 and ENG 102) and one course in Speech Communication (COM 101). In addition, students must demonstrate a sufficient level of skill and knowledge in the basic use of computers. This requirement may be satisfied by earning a passing grade in CIS 120, eme 2040 (offered at Florida Public colleges and universities), transfers to Flagler College as EDU 299),  or another computer literacy course.

 

In addition to the requirements of English, communication, and computer literacy, students must complete a minimum of two courses in the humanities, two courses in social science, two courses in mathematics at or above the 100 level, and one or more courses from any of the four groups listed below. The following list of courses comprises the Flagler College-Tallahassee General Education Program.

HUMANITIES

 

SOCIAL SCIENCES

ART 218

Visual Culture

 

ANT 201

Cultural Anthropology

ART 251

Survey of Art

History I

 

ECO 211

Principles of Microeconomics

ART 252

Survey of Art History II

 

ECO 212

Principles of Macroeconomics

ENG 211

Introduction to Early British Literature

 

HIS 101

Western Civilization I

ENG 212

Introduction to Late British Literature

 

HIS 102

Western Civilization II

ENG 221

Introduction to Early American Literature

 

HIS 201

Introduction to Latin America from Pre-Contact to Independence

ENG 222

Introduction to Late American Literature

 

HIS 202

Introduction to Latin America from Independence to Modern Day

FLA 199

Foreign Language

 

HIS 205

United States History to 1877

FLA 299

Foreign Language

 

HIS 206

United States History since 1877

HUM 199

Humanities

 

LAS 201

Introduction to Latin America from Pre-Contact to Independence

HUM 299

Humanities

 

LAS 202

Introduction to Latin America from Independence to Modern Day

MUS 101

Music Appreciation

 

POS 203

Introduction to Political Thought I

PHI 103

Introduction to Philosophy I

 

POS 204

Introduction to Political Thought II

REL 111

World Religion

 

POS 221

Politics in the United States

THA 201

Introduction to Drama & Literature

 

PSY 101

Introduction to Psychology

THA 221

Theatre History IisoH

 

PSY 201

Child Psychology

 

 

 

SOC 101

Introduction to Sociology

 

 

 

SOC 201

Contemporary Social Problems

 

 

 

SSC 199

Social Sciences

 

 

 

SCC 299

Social Sciences

 

MATHEMATICS

 

NATURAL SCIENCES

MAT 135

College Algebra

 

NAS 104

Life Science

MAT 199

Mathematics

 

NAS 105

Earth Science

MAT 201

Calculus I

 

NAS 107

Environmental Science

MAT 202

Calculus II

 

NAS 111

Introduction to Biological Science

MAT 223

Statistics

 

NAS 199

Natural Science

MAT 299

Mathematics

 

NAS 299

Natural Science

 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

 

In the following section, courses are listed alphabetically by area and subject.  Clear, correct, and effectively written and spoken English is expected of all students.  Reading comprehension is equally important.  Credit in any course may be withheld if the student fails to give evidence of competence in the prescribed reading and writing assignments.

 

Program

Day or Night

Credit hours

Typical Program Length (Assumes full-time enrollment with no break in enrollment).

Elementary Education 

Day

65

4 Semesters

Elementary Education

Night

65

5 semesters

 

 

 

 

Elementary Education/Exceptional Student Education 

Day

77

5 semesters

Elementary Education/Exceptional Student Education 

Night

77

6 semesters

Secondary Education – English

Day

74

5 Semesters

 

 

 

 

Business Administration

Day

63

4 Semesters

Business Administration

Night

63

5 Semesters

 

 

 

 

Accounting

Night

69

5 Semesters

 

 

 

 

Strategic Communication (Public Relations)

Night

63

 5 Semesters

 

 

ACCOUNTING (ACC)

 

Accounting Major Accounting is the language of business.  Accounting's objective is the communication of financial information to an entity's internal and external users for decision-making.  The objective of Flagler College-Tallahassee's Accounting program is to furnish junior and senior level undergraduate students with an academic curriculum that emphasizes comprehensive learning in the field of accounting and business administration.  The accentuation of relevant coursework in accounting and other business disciplines such as management, marketing, finance, business/corporate policy and economics will equip students with the tools for them to be successful in accounting careers (whether corporate, public accounting, not for profit organizations, or government service) or highly acknowledged graduate programs.  The coursework will prepare students for the option of pursuing professional licensing.

 

A total of 69 semester hours is required for the Accounting major.

 

COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE ACCOUNTING MAJOR

 

Prerequisite Courses:

Entering students are encouraged to complete the prerequisite course before entering the program.  In addition to the required prerequisite, it is recommended entering students have previously taken Principles of Financial Accounting and Principles of Managerial Accounting prior to entry. 

 

Courses Required for the Accounting Major

ACC 301          Accounting Theory and Practice

ACC 349         Intermediate Accounting I

ACC 350          Intermediate Accounting II

ACC 359          Managerial Accounting

ACC 360         Cost Accounting

ACC 361          Federal Income Tax

ACC 371          Accounting Information Systems

ACC 411           Intermediate Accounting III

ACC 448         Advanced Accounting

ACC 451          Auditing I

ACC 455          Professional Ethics and Regulation

BUS 230          Quantitative Methods in Business

BUS 307          Principles of Management

BUS 461          Human Resource Management

BUS 470         Strategic Management

CIS 206           Data Management for Business

ECO 211           Principles of Microeconomics

ECO 212          Principles of Macroeconomics

ECO 321          Money and Banking

FIN 301           Financial Management I

FIN 302          Financial Management II

LAW 310         Legal Environment for Business

MAT 223         Statistics

 

Additional Summer Electives for  Required CPA Hours

 

ACC 362          Corporate Taxation

ACC 461          Auditing II

 

ACC 301 –Accounting Theory & Practice (3)

This course introduces accounting majors to the process used in practice for the recognition, measurement and subsequent measurement (adjustments) of economic events affecting the financial position and results of operations of business entities.  The course will then explore the framework of concepts and principles on which Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) have been developed.

 

ACC 349 – Intermediate Accounting I (3)

Prerequisites: ACC 301.  This course offers an in-depth study of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as they relate to the role of accounting in society, preparation of financial statements, revenue recognition, and the time value of money.

 

ACC 350 – Intermediate Accounting II (3)

Prerequisite: ACC 349.  This course offers an in-depth study of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as they relate to business assets.

 

ACC 359- Managerial Accounting (3)

Prerequisite: ACC 301.  This course focuses on managerial accounting concepts, analyses, uses, and procedures.  Managerial accounting is recognized as a tool for the development and implementation of business strategy.  The emphasis is to help managers make better decisions.  The specific course content includes: financial statement analysis, cost-volume profit analysis, budgeting and variance analysis, pricing and cost management, the balanced scorecard, strategic profit analysis and capital budgeting.

 

ACC 360 – Cost Accounting (3)

Prerequisite: ACC 359.  This course focuses on cost accounting concepts, analyses, uses, and procedures.  Cost accounting is recognized as a tool for the costing of various cost objects.  Cost allocation is emphasized throughout the course.  The specific course content includes: inventory costing, job and process costing, activity-based costing, customer profitability and sales variance analysis, accounting for joint products, and transfer pricing.

 

ACC 361 – Federal Income Tax (3)

Prerequisites: ACC 301.  This course focuses on the introduction of federal income tax, research and planning.  The course also addresses the fundamental elements of individual income tax, including the tax formula, concepts of gross income, income exclusions, deductions, adjusted gross income, exemptions, credits and property transactions.

 

ACC 371 – Accounting Information Systems (3)

Prerequisites: ACC 301.    This course focuses on the design, operation and control of accounting information system applications, including the revenue, expenditure and conversion cycles.  The course also addresses the integration of systems that process financial transactions with information systems that process primarily nonfinancial data.

 

ACC 411 – Intermediate Accounting III (3)

Prerequisites: ACC 350.  This course offers an in-depth study of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as they relate to liabilities, stockholders' equity, earnings per share, accounting changes, and corrections of accounting errors.

 

ACC 448 – Advanced Accounting (3)

Prerequisite: ACC 411. This course offers an in-depth study of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as they relate to the equity and consolidation methods of accounting for investments, partnerships, foreign currency transactions, and variable interest entities.  This course also offers an examination of Governmental Accounting and Financial Reporting Standards as they relate to state and local governments.

 

ACC 451 – Auditing (3)

Prerequisites: ACC 371, ACC 411, and senior standing or approval from Instructor.  This course focuses on the fundamental concepts of auditing and attestation as it relates to Generally Accepted Auditing Standards.  The Auditor's Code of Professional Ethics and legal liability are also covered during the course. Other topics include developing audit program and procedures, consideration of internal controls, evaluation of audit evidence, and auditor's reporting responsibilities.

 

ACC 455 – Professional Ethics and Regulation (3)

Prerequisites: ACC 451 or permission of instructor.  This course will provide students with the ethical groundings to reconcile conflicts between stakeholders' interests which frequently present themselves in practice.

 

BUS 230 – Quantitative Methods in Business (3)

Prerequisites: MAT 135 or 171, and 223. This course is a continuation and application of material learned in College Algebra and Statistics. Mathematical and statistical techniques will be introduced, reviewed, and demonstrated in business-related applications. Topics which will be applied in business decision-making include: probability models, hypothesis testing, regression topics, basic calculus, and linear algebra.

 

BUS 307 – Principles of Management (3)

Prerequisite: Junior standing.  An introduction to the role of management in the successful operation of the business institution.  Topics include human relations, leadership, motivation, quality, strategic planning, and the history of management thought.

 

BUS 461 – Human Resource Management (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 307.  An examination of the personnel function, focusing primarily on job analysis, recruitment, performance appraisal, compensation, benefits, and managing the work force. 

 

BUS 470 – Strategic Management (3)

Prerequisites: BUS 307, MRK 310, FIN 301, and senior standing.  Through analysis of actual business cases, students will be expected to integrate the knowledge obtained in prior course work to analyze a firm's internal and external environment and develop, recommend, and implement business strategies in order to gain a competitive advantage.

 

CIS 206 – Data Management for Business (3)

Prerequisite: MAT 135 or equivalent. This course forces on skills used by a variety of productivity applications through hands-on problem-solving projects.  There is a specific emphasis on spreadsheets.  Projects will include financial calculations, charting, database management, and data analysis to enhance business productivity, time management, and decision-making. A lab fee may be required for this course.

 

ECO 211 – Principles of Microeconomics (3)

An introduction to the economic behavior of individual consumers and firms in perfect and imperfect markets.  Analyzes spontaneous market order and explores economic issues including international trade, market failure, and the benefits and costs of government intervention.  Microeconomic tools will be applied throughout the semester to evaluate contemporary public policy issues.

 

ECO 212- Principles of Macroeconomics (3)

An introduction to macroeconomic principles including national income determination, principles of short-run economic fluctuations, long-run economic growth, fiscal and monetary policy, and an introduction to international economics.

 

ECO 321 – Money and Banking (3)

Prerequisites: ECO 211 and ECO 212. A study of the functions of modern financial institutions, in particular, commercial banks and the Federal Reserve System. Their organizational structure and role in the economy are viewed in the concept of monetary and fiscal theory and policy.

 

FIN 301 – Financial Management I (3)

Prerequisites: ACC 301 or ACC 302, ECO 211, ECO 212, ECO 321,  BUS 230 and Junior standing. A study of the principles and practices of financial management.  Topics examined include: financial statement analysis, financial markets and interest rates, risk and return, time value of money, stock and bond valuation, sources and costs of capital, and capital budgeting analysis.

 

FIN 302 – Financial Management II (3)

Prerequisite: FIN 301.  A further study of the principles and practices of financial management.  Topics examined include: capital structure and leverage, dividend and stock repurchase policy, working capital management, financial planning and forecasting, derivatives and risk management, multinational financial management, hybrid financing, financing, and mergers and acquisitions.

 

LAW 310– Legal Environment of Business (3)

An introduction to legal issues that most directly impact business with emphasis on the authority, structure and organization of the American legal system; torts; crime; and contracts. 

 

MAT 223 – Statistics (3)

Prerequisites: MAT 135 or placement.  An introduction to the fundamental concepts and methods of statistics.  Topics include data organization; graphs and numerical measures; probability; binomial, normal, and sampling distributions; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; correlation; and regression.

 

 

ELECTIVE COURSES

 

ACC 362 – Corporate Taxation (3)

Prerequisites: ACC 361.  This course will focus on the corporate entity as opposed to the individual taxpayer.  Topics will include C-Corp, S-Corp, and LLC entities.  Extensive research techniques in taxation will accompany tax return preparation to provide students with practice simulations.

 

ACC 461 – Auditing II (3)

Prerequisite: ACC 451.  This course is a continuation of ACC 451.  This course will provide students with additional topics and developments related to the audit profession. 

 

ACC 391, 392, 393 – Accounting Independent Study (3, 3, 3)

Prerequisite: Junior standing.  Work in special area of student interest, subject to departmental approval and supervision.

 

ACC 481, 482, 483 – Accounting Internship (1-3, 1-3, 1-3)

Prerequisites: Junior standing with a minimum of 75 hours, with at least one full-time semester of credits earned at Flagler College prior to applying for the Internship Program; completion of ACC 301, 349, 350, and CIS 206; minimum of 2.8 cumulative grade point average; submission of application for internship and other internship-related forms to the Internship Coordinator for approval prior to registering for classes.  Practicum work experience allows the student to apply theories learned in the classroom to a practical experience.  Course requires a paper, two evaluations by the company supervisor of the accounting intern, a log, completion of 120 hours for three credits (or 80 hours for two credits, or 40 hours for one credit):, and periodic meetings with the Internship Coordinator.  Students can earn a maximum of 6 credit hours of ACC and/or BUS internships credit.  A maximum of 3 hours of ACC or BUS internship credit may be counting as a required business elective course.  For accounting majors only.  These courses can be repeated with a different company, e.g. 481 can be taken twice, subject to availability and the coordinators consent.  These courses are graded on a Pass/Fail system.

 

ACC 491, 492, 493 – Accounting Independent Study (3, 3, 3)

Prerequisite: Junior standing.  Work in special area of student interest, subject to departmental approval and supervision.

 

 



Courses Required for the Finance Minor

 

FIN 301 – Financial Management I (3)

Prerequisites: ACC 301 or ACC 302, ECO 211, ECO 212, and BUS 230 and Junior standing. (Note that non-Business Administration majors may substitute MAT 135 or 171 or 201 and MAT 223 for BUS 230).  A study of the principles and practices of financial management.  Topics examined include: financial statement analysis, financial markets and interest rates, risk and return, time value of money, stock and bond valuation, sources and costs of capital, and capital budgeting analysis.

 

FIN 302 – Financial Management II (3)

Prerequisite: FIN 301.  A further study of the principles and practices of financial management.  Topics examined include: capital structure and leverage, dividend and stock repurchase policy, working capital management, financial planning and forecasting, derivatives and risk management, multinational financial management, hybrid financing, financing, and mergers and acquisitions.

 

FIN 353 Investments (3)

Prerequisite: FIN 301.  A study of investment principles, investment instruments, and the financial marketplace.  Specific topics include: financial markets and securities, mutual funds and investment companies, portfolio theory and asset pricing models, market efficiency, bond valuation, and derivative securities.

 

FIN 450 International Finance (3)

Prerequisite: FIN 301. A study of the risks, opportunities, and financial management practices unique to multinational corporations.  Specific topics include: the international flow of funds; government influence on exchange rates; international arbitrage and interest rate parity; the relationship of inflation, interest rates, and exchange rates; measuring and managing translation, transaction, and economic exposure; and multinational capital budgeting.

 

FIN 453 Security Analysis and Portfolio Management (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 353.  A study of security analysis, asset allocation, and portfolio management.  Specific topics include: investor objectives and the investment process, macroeconomic and industry analysis, equity valuation, financial statement analysis, portfolio management and performance evaluation, international markets and investment instruments, behavioral finance, and technical analysis.

 

ECO 321 Money and Banking (3)

Prerequisites: ECO 211 and ECO 212.  A study of the functions of modern financial institutions, in particular, commercial banks, and the Federal Reserve System.  Their organizational structure and role in the economy are viewed in the concept of monetary and fiscal theory and policy.

 

 



Courses Required for the Marketing Minor

 

The student minoring in marketing must satisfactorily complete 18  credit hours of study, including 15 hours of required courses  MRK 310, 315, 318 and 415, and 6 hours of electives from the following courses MRK 311, 470 or BUS 481, 482, or 483.

 

MRK 310 – Principles of Marketing (3)

Prerequisite: Junior standing.  A survey of the principles, terminology, and functions of marketing, emphasizing product, price, place, and promotion.  The course will provide an understanding of the role of marketing in the business environment. WI

 

MRK 311 – Consumer Behavior (3)

Prerequisite: MRK 310.  The objective of the study of consumer behavior is to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of consumer buying patterns and business marketing strategies. Students will gain an understanding of the psychological (micro) process that consumers use to make buying decisions, as well as the cultural (macro) influences that shape the modern retail marketing process.

 

MRK 315 – Selling Principles and Methods (3)

Prerequisite: MRK 310.  Examination of principles and methods of selling with emphasis on the development of effective salesperson/customer relationships and presentations. 

 

MRK 318 – Principles of Advertising (3)

Prerequisites: MRK 310 for business administration and accounting majors/minors, BUS 101 or ART 218 or COM 208 for all other students.  This is an intermediate-level advertising class addressing the structure of the advertising industry including agency, marketing, and public relations uses.  The course covers advertising rationales, concepts, ethics, research methods, strategies, planning and the media mix including buying and placement considerations. 

 

MRK 415 – Advanced Sales Communications (3)

Prerequisite: MRK 315.  This course will examine the many dynamic aspects of interpersonal communication as it relates to professional selling.  Course objectives will include practical interpersonal communication skills, perceptions, listening, non-verbal communication, group dynamics, and professionalism.  Additional learning objectives include planning and preparing sales messages, oral communications (both one-on-one and group), and adapting messages for specific sales situations.

 

MRK 470 – Strategic Marketing(3)

Prerequisites: MRK 310.  The application of marketing concepts and techniques in a case study environment with emphasis on consumer behavior and the practical applications of marketing strategy.

 

 

 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (BUS)

 

Mission Statement:

The mission of the Business Administration Major, in the Department of Business Administration, is to provide students with academic programs and experiences of general and specialized learning in the fields of business administration (Management, Marketing, Accounting, Finance and Economics) to prepare them for responsible careers in the world of business and for graduate or professional studies.

 

COURSES REQUIRED FOR THE BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION MAJOR

 

A total of 63 semester hours is required for the Business Administration major. Students must satisfactorily complete:

 

Courses Required for the Business Administration Major

ACC 302          Accounting Information for Decision Makers

BUS 230          Quantitative Methods in Business

BUS 303          Management Information Systems

BUS 304         New Venture Creation and Development

BUS 307          Principles of Management

BUS 352          Financial Statement Analysis

BUS 430         International Business

BUS 441          Business Ethics

BUS 461          Human Resource Management

BUS 470          Strategic Management

BUS 474         Corporate Strategy

CIS 206           Data Management for Business

ECO 211           Principles of Microeconomics

ECO 212          Principles of Macroeconomics

ECO 321          Money and Banking

FIN 301           Financial Management I

FIN 302          Financial Management II

LAW 310         Legal Environment in Business

MAT 223         Statistics

MRK 310         Principles of Marketing

MRK 315         Selling Principles and Methods

 

ACC 302- Accounting Information for Decision Makers (3)

This course is a study of how financial and managerial accounting practices, principles and theories affect internal (mangers) and external (shareholders) users.  Emphasis is on the understanding of the techniques used to analyze and report the results and financial position of entities and how this data is used to make business decisions.

 

BUS 230 – Quantitative Methods in Business (3)

Prerequisites: MAT 135 or MAT 161 or MAT 171 or MAT 201, and 223. This course is a continuation and application of material learned in College Algebra and Statistics.  Mathematical and statistical techniques will be introduced, reviewed, and demonstrated in business-related applications.  Topics which will be applied in business decision-making will include: probability models, hypothesis testing, regression topics, basic calculus, and linear algebra.

 

BUS 303 – Management Information Systems (3)

This course provides an overview of information systems and how they provide value in organizations by supporting business objectives and decision-making.  Topics to be covered include types of information systems, the general theory of global systems and their relationship to the overall organization, as well as global e-business, technology infrastructure, databases and information management, telecommunications, the Internet and wireless technology, security, enterprise relationships, knowledge based systems, emerging technologies, and ethical and social issues.

 

BUS 304 – New Venture Creation and Development (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 307 or ENT 311. Students will identify and evaluate opportunities for new business ventures. Students aspiriting to be honorable entrepreneurs shape and evaluate business opportunities by taking into account customer preferences and the business and competitive climate. The course enables students to put entrepreneurial thought into practice by developing a business plan that might ultimately be used to launch their own venture. Cost to the class experience is the challenge of how to build and lead an honorable entrepreneurial organization. This course is cross-listed as ENT 304.

 

BUS 307 – Principles of Management (3)

Prerequisite: Junior Standing.  An introduction to the role of management in the successful operation of the business institution.  Topics include human relations, leadership, motivation, quality, strategic planning, and the history of management thought.

 

BUS 352 – Financial Statement Analysis (3)

Prerequisite: ACC 302. Financial statement analysis consists of the application of analytical tools and techniques to financial statements and data in order to derive from them measurements and relationships that are significant and useful for decision making.

 

BUS 430 – International Business (3)

Prerequisite: Junior Standing.  This course is designed to familiarize the student with the fundamentals of international trade, including cultural, political and legal, economic, financial, operational, and organizational variables associated with today's global economy.

 

BUS 441 – Business Ethics (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 307 and Junior Standing. An introduction to types of ethical theories and approaches to decision-making.  The course identifies moral issues involved in the management of specific problem areas of business and acquaints students with ethical concepts relevant to resolving morel issues in business.

 

BUS 461 – Human Resource Management (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 307.  An examination of the personnel function, focusing primarily on job analysis, recruitment, performance appraisal, compensation, benefits, and managing the work force. 

 

BUS 470 – Strategic Management (3)

Prerequisites: FIN 301, BUS 307, MRK 310, and Senior Standing.  The first of two capstone courses for business majors.  Through analysis of actual business cases, students will be expected to integrate the knowledge obtained in prior coursework to analyze a firm's internal and external environment and develop, recommend, and implement business strategies in order to gain a competitive advantage.

 

BUS 474 – Corporate Strategy (3)

Prerequisites: BUS 470 and Senior Standing. A study of corporate level strategy formulation and implementation in business corporations. Case analyses are used to make decisions about corporate strategy and industry attractiveness.

 

CIS 206 – Data Management for Business (3)

Prerequisite MAT 135 or Equivalent. This course focuses on skills used by a variety of production applications through hands-on problem-solving projects.  There is a specific emphasis on spreadsheets.  Projects will include financial calculations, charting, database management, and data analysis to enhance business productivity, time management, and decision-making.

 

ECO 211 – Principles of Microeconomics (3)

An introduction to the economic behavior of individual consumers and firms in perfect and imperfect markets.  Analyzes spontaneous market order and explores economic issues including international trade, market failure, and the benefits and costs of government intervention.  Microeconomic tools will be applied throughout the semester to evaluate contemporary public policy issues.

 

ECO 212 – Principles of Macroeconomics (3)

An introduction to macroeconomic principles including national income determination, principles of short-run economic fluctuations, long-run economic growth, fiscal and monetary policy, and an introduction to international economics.

 

ECO 321 – Money and Banking (3)

Prerequisites: ECO 211 and ECO 212.  A study of the functions of modern financial institutions, in particular, commercial banks and the Federal Reserve System.  Their organizational structure and role in the economy are viewed in the concept of monetary and fiscal theory and policy.

 

FIN 301 – Financial Management I (3)

Prerequisites: ACC 301 or ACC 302, ECO 211, ECO 212, ECO 321, and BUS 230 and Junior Standing. A study of the principles and practices of financial management.  Topics examined include: financial statement analysis, financial markets and interest rates, risk and return, time value of money, stock and bond valuation, sources and costs of capital, and capital budgeting analysis.

 

FIN 302 – Financial Management II (3)

Prerequisite: FIN 301.  A further study of the principles and practices of financial management.  Topics examined include: capital structure and leverage, dividend and stock repurchase policy, working capital management, financial planning and forecasting, derivatives and risk management, multinational financial management, hybrid financing, financing, and mergers and acquisitions.

 

LAW 310 – Legal Environment of Business (3)

An introduction to the legal issues that most directly impact business with emphasis on the authority, structure, and organization of the American legal system. The course also specifically addresses criminal law, torts, and contracts including the Uniform Commercial Code.

 

MAT 223 – Statistics (3)

Prerequisites: MAT 135 or placement.  An introduction to the fundamental concepts and methods of statistics.  Topics include data organization; graphs and numerical measures; probability; binomial, normal, and sampling distributions; confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; correlation; and regression.

 

MRK 310 – Principles of Marketing (3)

Prerequisite: Junior standing.  A survey of the principles, terminology, and functions of marketing, emphasizing product, price, place, and promotion.  The course will provide an understanding of the role of marketing in the business environment.

 

MRK 315 – Selling Principles and Methods (3)

Prerequisite: MRK 310. Examination of principles and methods of selling with emphasis on the development of effective salesperson/customer relationships and presentations.

 

ELECTIVE COURSES

 

BUS 391, 392, 393 – Independent Study (1-6, 1-6, 1-6)

Prerequisite: Junior Standing.  Work in a special area of student interest, subject to departmental approval and supervision.

 

BUS 440 – Selected Topics (3)

An in-depth examination of a current business topic that is not covered in existing courses.

 

BUS 408 – Organizational Behavior (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 307. The study of how individuals and groups impact the behavior and performance of organizations. Emphasis will be placed on improving organization productivity and performance through enhancing motivation, communication, and leadership skills, and related organizational applications.

 

BUS 409 – Entrepreneurship and New Ventures (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 307. The organization and operation of the small business with an examination of the opportunities, characteristics, and problems associated with this type of enterprise with emphasis on start-up decisions and business plans.

 

BUS 481, 482, 483 – Business Internship (1-3, 1-3, 1-3)

Prerequisites: Junior standing with a minimum of 75 hours, with at least one full-time semester of credits earned at Flagler College prior to applying for the Internship Program; completion of BUS 307, MRK 310, ACC 302, ECO 211, ECO 212, and CIS 206; minimum of 2.5 cumulative grade point average; submission of application for internship and other internship-related forms to the Internship Coordinator for approval prior to registering for classes.  Practicum work experience allows the student to apply theories learned in the classroom to a practical experience.  Course requires a paper, two evaluations by the company supervisor of the accounting intern, a log, completion of 120 hours for three credits (or 80 hours for two credits, or 40 hours for one credit):, and periodic meetings with the Internship Coordinator.  Students can earn a maximum of 6 credit hours of ACC or BUS internship credits.  A maximum of 3 hours of ACC or BUS internship credits may be counted as a required business elective course.  For business administration majors only. These courses can be repeated with a different company, e.g.481 can be taken twice, subject to availability and the coordinator's consent.  These courses are graded on a Pass/Fail system.

 

 



Elective Courses Required for the Finance Minor

 

FIN 301 Financial Management (3)

Prerequisites: ACC 301 or ACC 302, ECO 211, ECO 212 and BUS 230 and Junior Standing.  A study of the principles and practices of financial management.  Topics examined include: financial statement analysis, financial markets and interest rates, risk and return, time value of money, stock and bond valuation, sources and cost of capital, and capital budgeting analysis.

 

FIN 302 Financial Management (3)

Prerequisite: FIN 301.  A further study of the principles and practices of financial management.  Topics examined include: capital structure and leverage, dividend and stock repurchase policy, working capital management, financial planning and forecasting, derivatives and risk management, multinational financial management, hybrid financing, financing, and mergers and acquisitions.

 

FIN 353 Investments (3)

Prerequisite: FIN 301   A study of investment principles, investment instruments, and the financial marketplace.  Specific topics include: financial markets and securities, mutual funds and investment companies, portfolio theory and asset pricing models, market efficiency, bond valuation, and derivative securities.

 

FIN 450 International Finance (3)

Prerequisite: FIN 301.  A study of the risks, opportunities, and financial management practices unique to multinational corporations.  Specific topics include: the international flow of funds; government influence on exchange rates; international arbitrage and interest rate parity; the relationship of inflation, interest rates, and exchange rates; measuring and managing translation, transaction, and economic exposure; and multinational capital budgeting.

 

FIN 453 Security Analysis and Portfolio Management (3)

Prerequisite: BUS 353.  A study of security analysis, asset allocation, and portfolio management.  Specific topics include: investor objectives and the investment process, macroeconomic and industry analysis, equity valuation, financial statement analysis, portfolio management and performance evaluation, international markets and investment instruments, behavioral finance, and technical analysis.

 

ECO 321 Money and Banking (3)

Prerequisites:  ECO 211 and ECO 212.  A study of the functions of modern financial institutions, in particular, commercial banks, and the Federal Reserve System.  Their organizational structure and role in the economy are viewed in the concept of monetary and fiscal theory and policy.

 

 



Elective Courses Required for the Marketing Minor

The student minoring in marketing must satisfactorily complete 18  credit hours of study, including 12 hours of required courses  MRK 310, 315, 318, and 415 and 6 hours of electives from the following courses MRK  311, 470  or BUS 481, 482, or 483 (Business Internships. See Page 57).

 

MRK 310 – Principles of Marketing (3)          

Prerequisite: Junior standing.  A survey of the principles, terminology, and functions of marketing, emphasizing product, price, place, and promotion.  The course will provide an understanding of the role of marketing in the business environment.

 

MRK 311 – Consumer Behavior (3)

Prerequisite: MRK 310.  The objective of the study of consumer behavior is to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of consumer buying patterns and business marketing strategies. Students will gain an understanding of the psychological (micro) process that consumers use to make buying decisions, as well as the cultural (macro) influences that shape the modern retail marketing process.

 

MRK 315 – Selling Principles and Methods (3)

Prerequisite: MRK 310.  Examination of principles and methods of selling with emphasis on the development of effective salesperson/customer relationships and presentations. 

 

MRK 318 – Principles of Advertising (3)

Prerequisites: MRK 310 for business administration and accounting majors/minors, BUS 101 or ART 218 or COM 208 for all other students.  This is an intermediate-level advertising class addressing the structure of the advertising industry including agency, marketing, and public relations uses.  The course covers advertising rationales, concepts, ethics, research methods, strategies, planning and the media mix including buying and placement considerations. 

 

MRK 415 – Advanced Sales Communications (3)

Prerequisite: MRK 315.  This course will examine the many dynamic aspects of interpersonal communication as it relates to professional selling.  Course objectives will include practical interpersonal communication skills, perceptions, listening, non-verbal communication, group dynamics, and professionalism.  Additional learning objectives include planning and preparing sales messages, oral communications (both one-on-one and group), and adapting messages for specific sales situations.

 

MRK 470 – Strategic Marketing (3)

Prerequisite: MRK 310.  The application of marketing concepts and techniques in a case study environment with emphasis on consumer behavior and the practical applications of marketing strategy.

 

 

 


ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

 

Students majoring in Elementary Education with the ESOL and Reading Endorsements must complete the following general education requirements:  two English courses, two social science courses (including American History), one public speaking course, two humanities courses, three math courses (including a Liberal Arts math), and  three science courses.

 

In addition, Elementary Education majors must complete one prerequisite course: EDU 202: Introduction to Child and Adolescent Development in the Educational Setting (or equivalent coursework).

 

The professional education and subject area specific courses that the elementary education major must complete are as follows:  EDU 241, EDU 321, EDU 309, EDU 242, EDU 355, EDU 357, EDU 461, EDU 481, EEL 301, EEL 302, EEL 342, EEL 362, EEL 364, EEL 365, EEL 431, EEL 455, ESL 315, ESL 325, ESL 415 and EDU 309.

 

ELEMENTARY/EXCEPTIONAL STUDENT EDUCATION

 

Students majoring in Elementary/Exceptional Student Education with the ESOL and Reading Endorsements must complete the following general education requirements:  two English courses, two social science courses (including American History), two humanities courses, three math courses (including a Liberal Arts math), and three science courses.

 

In addition, Elementary/Exceptional Student Education majors must complete one prerequisite course: EDU 202: Introduction to Child and Adolescent Development in the Educational Setting (or equivalent coursework). 

           

The professional education and subject area specific courses that the elementary education major must complete are as follow:  EDU 241, EDU 321, EDU 242, EDU 309, EDU 355, EDU 357, EDU 461, EDU 481, EEL 301, EEL 302, EEL 342, EEL 362, EEL 364, EEL 365, EEL 431, EEL 455, ESL 315, ESL 325, ESL 415, EDU 309, ESE 330, ESE 365, ESE 420, and ESE 425.

 

Courses Required for Both Education Majors

EDU 202         Introduction to Child and Adolescent Development in the Educational Setting

EDU 241         Professional Development Seminar I

EDU 321         General Methods of Instruction

EDU 242         Instructional Design for Teaching and Learning

EDU 309         Introduction to Techniques in Exceptionality

EDU 355         Tests and Measurements

EDU 357         Classroom Management

EDU 461         Professional Development Seminar II

EDU 481         Internship

EEL 301          Elementary Reading Instruction

EEL 302          Children's Literature: Reading Across the Content Areas

EEL 342          Elementary Methods of Social Studies

EEL 362          Elementary Methods of Mathematics

EEL 364          Elementary Methods in Sciences

EEL 365          Elementary Methods in the Arts

EEL 431          Elementary Methods of Language Arts

EEL 455          Diagnostic Reading

ESL 315          Cross Cultural Communications

ESL 325          Applied Linguistics

ESL 415          ESOL Curriculum and Materials Development

 

Prerequisite Course

 

EDU 202 - Introduction to Child and Adolescent Development in the Educational Setting (3)

EDU 202 is a study of the foundations and practice of education, the place of education in society, and the history of the American educational system. Students will also study the behavioral and cognitive learning theories necessary for understanding child development (birth-adulthood), including a focus on behavioral and cognitive learning theories, critical theory, and motivation of the individual learner.

 

EDU 241 – Professional Development Seminar I (1)

An introductory course designed to familiarize students with programmatic requirements including portfolio requirements and development of the pre-internship portfolio for all education majors.

 

EDU 309 – Introduction and Techniques in Exceptionality (3) (Required of all Education Majors)

Prerequisite: EDU 202 or departmental permission.  An introductory course in the field of special education.  Various categories of students identified in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) will be examined. Practicum required.

 

EDU 321 – General Methods and Instruction (3)

Prerequisite: EDU 202 or departmental permission.  A survey of various models and strategies with practice in instructional planning and lesson presentation.

 

EDU 242 – Instructional Design for Teaching and Learning (3)

Co-requisite: EDU 321 or departmental permission.  Educational technology applied to classroom instruction in grades K-12 and in exceptional student education.  Laboratory required.

 

EDU 355 – Tests and Measurements (3)

Prerequisites: EDU 321 and one methods course.  Basic principles of education testing to include: content measured by state achievement tests; how data may be used to improve student learning; and statistical concepts necessary to administer and interpret testing instruments.

 

EDU 357 – Classroom Management, School Safety, Professional Ethics, and Educational Law (3)

Prerequisites: EDU 202 and one methods course or departmental permission.  A study of research based practices for effectively managing a classroom.  Attention will also be given to issues of school safety, ethics and the teaching profession, and laws governing educational systems.

 

EDU 461 – Professional Development Seminar II (1)

Prerequisites: Enrollment in final semester of coursework prior to internship.  A study of topics to include Florida Accomplished Practices, managing and using a portfolio, legal issues in education, certification requirements, and internship responsibilities.

 

EDU 481 – Internship (15)

Prerequisites: Permission of the Education Department, and passage of all FTCE required for major.  Student teaching requires one full semester of the student's senior year.  No other courses may be taken during the internship without special permission of the Department.  Elementary Education majors with a concentration in Exceptional Student Education will intern in both specialization areas.

 

 

Professional Education Courses, Special Conditions

 

EDU 340 – Selected Topics in Education (3)

Prerequisites: EDU 202 and EDU 321 or instructional permission.  Seminars investigating or exploring topics in education not covered in other courses, issues emerging in the field. 

 

EDU 440 – Selected Topics (3)

Prerequisites: Instructor permission, majors only.  Advanced seminars investigating specialized issues, topics, or research in education and subfields.  Focus is on developing depth in areas not addressed significantly in other education courses. 

 

EDU 491, 492, 493 – Independent Studies (3, 3, 3)

Independent or directed study on a subject chosen and outlined by the advanced student with the approval of the instructor and the Department Chairperson.  The study should involve considerable research and may include practical experience with students.

 

 

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION (EEL)

The following courses are required for all elementary education majors.  This major is designed for the student whose primary interest is teaching in the elementary classroom, grades kindergarten to sixth.  Content in each methods course will include instruction on teaching the objectives and goals in the Next Generation Sunshine State Standards and/or the Florida Standards.

 

 

Courses Required for Elementary Education Major and Elementary Education/Exceptional Student Education Major

 

EEL 301 – Elementary Reading Instruction (3)

Prerequisite: EDU 202, or departmental permission.  This course will provide students with an understanding of the reading process, beginning reading instruction, and teaching reading across the content areas for the primary and intermediate grades.  Practicum required.

 

EEL 302 – Children's Literature: Reading Across the Content Areas (3)

Prerequisite: EDU 202, or departmental permission. Students will be immersed in a variety of quality children's literature.  Distinguishing features of fiction and nonfiction text, as well as strategies and techniques designed to facilitate reading comprehension across the content areas will be covered in this course.

 

EEL 342- Elementary Methods in Social Studies (3)

Prerequisite: EDU 321.  Strategies and methods for teaching social studies in the elementary school. Practicum required.

 

EEL 362 – Elementary Methods – Mathematics (3)

Prerequisite: EDU 321.  Techniques of diagnosing and analyzing mathematical problems and teaching mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division.  Practicum required.

 

EEL 364 – Elementary Methods in Science (3)

Prerequisite: EDU 321.  An interdisciplinary approach to instructional planning and teaching science in the electuary grades. Practicum required.

 

EEL 365 – Elementary Methods in the Arts (3)

Prerequisite: EDU 321.  An interdisciplinary approach to teaching music, art, dance/movement, and creative drama in the elementary grades.  Practicum required.

 

EEL 431 – Elementary Methods of Language Arts (3)

Prerequisites: EDU 321, EEL 301, EEL 302.  Gain an understanding of reading and writing processes and the principles of and techniques/strategies for teaching an effective language arts program.  Practicum required.

 

EEL 455 – Diagnostic Reading (3)

Prerequisites: EDU 321 and EEL 301.  Examines various kinds of reading problems with techniques for diagnosis of difficulties and possible methods of treatment.  Practicum required.

 

 

Courses Required for English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL)

 

ESL 315 – Cross Cultural Communications (3)

This course examines diversity in the sociopolitical, cultural, and linguistic contexts of teaching and learning. 

 

ESL 325 – Applied Linguistics (Approved for ESOL Credit) (3)

Prerequisite: EDU 202.  This course is designed to provide the student with means for examining language and culture and to extend this inquiry to education settings.

 

ESL 415 – ESOL Curriculum and Materials Development (3)

Prerequisite: EDU 321.  The purpose of this course is to study curricula taught to English Language Learners (ELL) students and the types of instructional material that may be developed to assist LEP students in achieving success in public school classrooms.  Practicum required.

 

 

Courses Required for Exceptional Student Education (ESE)

Students with a specialization in exceptional student education and elementary education are required to complete the ESE courses specified for their major. 

 

EDU 309 – Introduction and Techniques in Exceptionality (3) (Required of all Education Majors)

Prerequisite: EDU 202 or departmental permission.  An introductory course in the field of special education.  Various categories of students identified in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) will be examined. Practicum required.

 

ESE 330 – Techniques in Assessment of Exceptional Children (3) (Required of all EEL/ESE Majors)

Prerequisites: EDU 202 and EDU 309, or departmental permission. (Recommended: EDU 355).  The student will develop skills in understanding measurement in the areas of intelligence, adaptive behavior, social emotional behavior, and academic achievement. 

 

ESE 365 – Language Development and Speech Disabilities (3) (Required of all EEL/ESE Majors)

Prerequisite: EDU 202 or departmental permission.  A survey of the development of language and speech in children with consideration of the problems of students served in the Exceptional Student education programs.  Observation in special education settings required. 

 

ESE 420 – Instructional Practices: Elementary Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities (3) (Required of EEL/ESE Majors)

Prerequisites: EDU 309 and EEL 301.  Students learn instructional approaches and materials for teaching pre-academic, academic, and social/behavioral skills through assessment, task analysis, and applications of research supported methodologies for students with mild/moderate disabilities within the school environment.  Practicum required.

 

ESE 425 – Instructional Practices: Secondary Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities (3) (Required of EEL/ESE Majors)

Prerequisite: EDU 309.  A study of best practices for managing and teaching secondary students with mild to moderate disabilities.  Content includes but not limited to: instructional practices for teaching subject matter; individual educational /transitional plans; classroom management techniques; teaching 50 and 90 minute instructional blocks; using technology to enhance academic instruction and; and, state testing requirements for standard and special high school diplomas.  Practicum required.

 

 

Exceptional Student Education Courses, Special Conditions

 

SLS 201 – Introduction to American Sign Language (3)

Prerequisites: None.  A beginning level course which takes students who have no knowledge of Sign Language to the point where they can feel comfortable in a wide variety of situations.    This may include, within a deaf community or with a child with special needs that may need or use an alternate form of communication.

 

ESE 450 – Senior Research Seminar in Special Education (3)

Prerequisites: EDU 309 and ESE 420 or ESE 425 or permission of Instructor, acceptance into the Education Department.   Students learn the scientific method and procedures used in educational research (action, experimental, descriptive, philosophical, and historical) and apply that knowledge through reading, reviewing, discussing research, and conducting a small research project/artifact in conjunction with the 25-hour field-based practicum assignment.

 

The content of exceptional student education courses at Flagler College follows the standards and ethics established for professional training and practice by the Council for Exceptional Children, and incorporates the Florida Department of Education accomplished practices for pre-service teachers, and the ESE K-12 Competencies and Skills Required for Teacher Certification in Florida, 20th Edition.

 

 



ENGLISH EDUCATION, SECONDARY

Students who complete their studies in Secondary Education/English are eligible to receive certification to teach the content area of English in middle and high schools. In addition, students obtain ESOL endorsement

 

Courses Required for English Education Majors

EDU 202         Introduction to Child and Adolescent Development in the Educational Setting

EDU 241         Professional Development Seminar I

EDU 321         General Methods of Instruction

EDU 242         Instructional Design for Teaching and Learning

EDU 355         Tests and Measurements

EDU 357         Classroom Management

EDU 461         Professional Development Seminar II

EDU 481         Internship

ESL 315          Cross Cultural Communications

ESL 325          Applied Linguistics

ESL 415          ESOL Curriculum and Materials Development

ENG 311          Advanced Academic Writing

ENG 315         Shakespeare I

ENG 325         African American Literature

ENG 334         Mythology

ENG 341         Literary Criticism

ENG 345         Film Literature

ENG 401         Renaissance Literature

ENG 425         Modern American Literature

ENG 450         Modern and Contemporary British Literature

SED 363         Principles of Content Reading

SED 364         Methods of Teaching English

 

 

Secondary Education (SED) Courses

 

SED 363 – Principles of Content Reading (3)

Prerequisite: EDU 321. Methods of assisting the secondary school student with reading and study techniques in various subject areas. Required of all Secondary Education majors. 20-hour practicum required.       

 

SED 364 – Methods of Teaching English (3)

Prerequisite: EDU 321. (Restricted to Secondary Education – English majors only). A survey of the methods of teaching language arts in grades 6-12 including historical surveys of literature and literary types with special emphasis on teaching techniques, and working with LEP students. 30-hour practicum required.

 

 

English (ENG) Courses

 

ENG 311 – Advanced Academic Writing (3)

Prerequisite: ENG 101; sophomore standing. This course prepares students for writing in the upper division English courses.  Students will refine their writing skills, gain proficiency in MLA formatting, develop advanced critical reading and thinking skills, and acquire the ability to use technology to facilitate their research in databases related to English studies and in various assignments.  Significant emphasis will focus on the academic essay.

 

ENG 315 – Shakespeare I (3)

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.  ENG 211. This course examines the career of William Shakespeare beginning with the early comedies, and continuing through the history plays and tragedies to the late romances.  The following themes, motifs, and conventions may be explored: the meaning of dramatized locations; the value of role playing; the process of sexual maturation and identity; political legitimacy; the disruptive force of ego assertion; genre as a symbolic and social form.

 

ENG 325 – African American Literature (3)

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.  This course is a survey of African American literature from its beginnings to the Harlem Renaissance and the Contemporary period.  African American literature is central to understanding the broader American experience.  It confronts directly the troubling and tragic legacy of slavery, segregation, and racism in the United States.  In examining the development of this tradition and its experiments, students will encounter a number of genres, including prose fiction, poetry, and autobiographical narrative.

 

ENG 334 – Mythology (3)

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.  This course offers an overview of a variety of myth texts.  Paired with literature based upon or reinventing these myths, such study will provide students with both a mythological background which will enhance their readings of subsequent literature which draws upon a rich mythic pool (Medieval, Renaissance, Romantic, Contemporary, etc.) with an on-going analyss of their use by authors from a variety of genres, literary periods, and cultures.

 

ENG 341 – Literary Criticism (3)

Prerequisite: Junior standing.  Study of the theoretical frameworks which can be applied to literature, such as new criticism, Marxism, feminism, deconstruction, new historicism, psychoanalytic criticism, postcolonial criticism, and cultural criticism.

 

ENG 345 – Film Literature (3)

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.  An examination of film as it relates to literature, society, art, and culture. Students will be exposed to various approaches to understanding film as well as to methods of thinking and writing  critically about film-making and technique.  Film choices range from classic to contemporary, well-known to obscure, and may cover several genres.

 

ENG 401 – Renaissance Literature (3)

Prerequisites: Junior standing; ENG 211 and ENG 212.  This course will examine the remarkable outpouring of poetry and prose that occurred in England during the 16th and 17th centuries.  Subjects may include the plain style poetics of Wyatt and Raleigh; the varied sonnet sequences of Shakespeare, Spenser, and Sidney; the epic poems of Spenser and Milton; the introspective writings of Donne and Burton; and the dramatic works of Shakespeare and his contemporaries.

 

ENG 425 – Modern American Literature (3)

Prerequisites: Junior standing; ENG 221 and ENG 222. Intensive study of a limited number of classic works in the Modern American period, usually including works by cummings, Eliot, James, Hemingway, HD, Faulkner, Pound, Stein, Stevens, Williams, and others.

 

ENG 450 – Modern and Contemporary British Literature (3)

Prerequisites: Junior standing; ENG 211 and ENG 212.  This course will examine developments in Modern and Contemporary British literature from the early 20th century to the early 21st century, as well as relevant social, cultural, political, and aesthetic contexts.  The time covered represents a body of literature coping with a rapidly changing country, from the multiple crises surrounding WWI and its aftermath, to Britain's decline as an empire, to Britain's place in a contemporary globalized world.  Representative texts may come from a number of genres, including poetry, the novel and short story, autobiography, drama, and the essay.

 

 

ENRICHMENT COURSES

 

ENG 010 - College Writing (0)

Prerequisites:  None.  Covers techniques of writing with an emphasis on the basics: mechanics, sentence structure, paragraph structure and organization.  Students referred to this class must attend in the first semester following the referral and must pass ENG 010 before graduating from Flagler College.

           

PDH 300 - Career Development (0)

Prerequisites:  None.  Using a seminar format, this course provides a comprehensive evaluation of personal and professional development, with focus on evaluation and selection of career fields and occupations, planning goals and objectives, selecting jobs and internships, and preparing for job search. 

 

 



Strategic Communication (Public Relations)

 

The Strategic Communication (Public Relations) major is an integrated degree program that prepares students for careers in business, communications, government and non-profit organizations.  The successful candidate achieves broad knowledge of, and skill sets in, writing, oral communication, public relations, marketing and sales.  Students will also earn a minor in marketing.  The marketing minor will prepare the graduate for entry level positions in sales and is ideal for students who may wish to apply their skills in private or public sector leadership roles.  The internship program will deepen the candidate's experience in one or more core areas.  With these skill sets, the Flagler College-Tallahassee Strategic Communication graduate will be a competitive candidate for marketing, sales, advertising, public relations and management positions in the public and private sectors.

 

A total of 47 hours is required for the Strategic Communication (Public Relations) major to include: COM 208, 213, 224, 226, 311, 358, 359, 362, 403, 420, 462, 463, 464, (481, or 482, or 483), ART 230 and MRK 310. In addition, students will complete a marketing minor. The minor in marketing requires 15 additional hours beyond the major, including MRK 311, 315, 318, 415, 470.

 

PREREQUISITE COURSES

 

COM 101 - Speech Communication (3)

An introduction to speech communication with special emphasis on the practical skills of public speaking.  Learning objectives include civility and listening skills, planning and preparing a message, putting information into oral presentation form, and adapting messages to specific speaking situations.

 

ENG 101 – Composition I (3)

Introduction to the writing process concentrating on building individual student's writing habits and behaviors.  Includes a study of prewriting, idea development, organization and form. A series of short papers is required.

 

Courses Required for Strategic Communication/Public Relations Major

Core Requirements (12 credit hours)

 

COM 208        Introduction to Media

COM 213        Media Literacy

COM 362        Media Ethics

COM 420        Media Law

 

Major Requirements (29) credit hours

COM 224        Foundations of PR/Strategic Communication

COM 226        Writing and Production for PR/Strategic Communication

COM 311         Advanced Writing for PR/Strategic Communication

COM 358        Social Media for PR/Strategic Communication

COM 359        Digital Media for PR/Strategic Communication

COM 403        PR/Strategic Communication Theory and Research

COM 462        PR/Strategic Communication Case Analysis

COM 463        PR/Strategic Communication Campaigns

COM 470        Portfolio Review

COM 481, 482 or 483   Communication Internship

 

Professional Enhancement Electives (7 credit hours)

ART 230          Graphic Design for the Non-Major

MRK 310         Principles of Marketing

 

Requirements for the Marketing Minor (15 credit hours)

MRK 311         Consumer Behavior

MRK 315         Selling Principles and Methods

MRK 318         Principles of Advertising

MRK 415         Advanced Sales Communications

MRK 470        Strategic Marketing

 

Students must also complete the marketing minor which includes the following course:

 

COM 208 - Introduction to Media (3)

This is an introductory course on Mass Communication in the United States today.  It examines the historical, economic, technological, political, and legal influences on the major media and the industries that produce content for them.  Students closely examine the news, public relations, broadcasting, advertising, and entertainment industries. 

 

COM 213 - Media Literacy (3)

Prerequisite or co-requisite:  COM 208.  This course introduces students to the critical thinking skills used when interpreting media messages and their impact.  Using digital media as a model, students will understand how the structure, frameworks, and elements of media shapes these messages, as well as analyze cognitive, emotional, and social reactions to such messages.

 

COM 362 - Media Ethics (3)

Prerequisites:  COM 208 and COM 213.  This course examines applied and professional ethics that define responsible communication among media practitioners.  Issues to be addressed include truthfulness, privacy, secrecy, professional accountability, media and social justice, and the values cultivated by the entertainment industry. 

 

COM 420 - Media Law (3)

Prerequisites:  COM 362 or LAW 380.  A study of the legal rights and responsibilities of the mass media and their relationship to contemporary law.  Includes problems of constitutional law. Libel, privacy, access, confidentiality, and government regulation. 

 

 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

 

COM 224 - Foundations of PR/Strategic Communication (3) (equivalent to COM 222)

Prerequisites:  COM 208 and sophomore standing.  An introduction to the process of how organizations develop communication plans that enable them to present and promote their objectives to stakeholders.  Emphasis is placed upon how brand and reputation messages maintain the identity of organizations. 

 

COM 226 - Writing and Production for PR/Strategic Communication (4) (equivalent to COM 215)     

Prerequisites:  COM 224.  Students will learn how to write strategically and create effective messages for public relations and advertising.  Through skill-based and technology-enriched writing and productions activities students will learn the principles of identifying and reaching targeted stakeholders through well executed messages.

 

COM 311 - Advanced Writing for PR/Strategic Communication (3) (equivalent to COM 310)

Prerequisites:  COM 226.  This course includes writing for print, electronic, controlled, and uncontrolled media and publications.  Emphasis is given to research, audience analysis, and selection of appropriate writing styles and media.  The course prepares students for advanced writing in public relations and provides practice in developing news releases, event planning, report writing, newsletters, and presentations. 

 

COM 358 - Social Media for PR/Strategic Communication (3) (equivalent to COM 355)

Prerequisites:  COM 224 or permission.  This course will focus on how to tap into the new consumer-driven media environment and gain access to audience intelligence necessary to properly brand and promote a company or client.  We will compare traditional mainstream media used in public relations to new social media and emphasize the marriage that needs to exist between the two if promotional efforts are to be maximized in a rapidly changing environment. 

 

COM 359 - Digital Media for PR/Strategic Communication (3)

Prerequisite: COM 224.  This course is designed to provide students with realistic skills and experiences in the research, planning, execution and evaluations of emerging digital media as applied to the fields of communication such as public relations and advertising.  They will gain knowledge of the characteristics of digital media in addition to a demographic and psychographic analysis of specific audiences that utilizes these communication tools. 

 

COM 403 - PR/Strategic Communication Theory and Research (3) (equivalent to COM 402)

Prerequisites:  COM 213 and COM 224. Strategic Communication Research involves the acquisition, evaluation, and analysis of information for strategic communication and marketing decisions. Emphasis is given to six primary areas: understanding the scientific method for answering brand- and marketing communication-based questions, developing explicit and measurable research objectives, developing adequate research plans to solve those objectives, implementing appropriate methodologies to answer the questions proposed by the objectives, analyzing data, and understanding the use of both descriptive and inferential statistics and preparing the reports that communicate the results of the research.

 

COM 462 - PR/Strategic Communication Case Analysis (3)

Prerequisites:  COM 224 and COM 362.  A course focusing on the comprehension and application of the concepts of organizational rhetoric to cases where strategic messages are conveyed to stakeholders.  The central aim of the course is for students to develop the capacity for practice reason – applying principles to specific instances – so that they understand the impact and consequences of strategic communication. 

 

COM 463 - PR/Strategic Communication Campaigns (3)

Prerequisites:  COM 311 and COM 403.  Using the principles and techniques of public relations to analyze case studies and to create strategies and campaigns.  Course includes the analysis of a specific situation and the design and construction of an actual campaign.  Includes use of desktop publishing and an introduction to public relations in cyberspace. 

 

COM 470  - Portfolio for PR/Strategic Communication (1)

Prerequisite. Completion of 100 credit hours.  Strategic communication majors who have accrued 100 or more credit hours must take this course.  It should be taken during the student's last semester at Flagler College and requires the preparation of an electronic portfolio in strategic communication.  The portfolio must be acceptable to a majority of the full-time strategic communication faculty.  Students will answer questions in an oral defense of the portfolio.

 

COM 481, 482, or 483 - Communication Internship (1-12, 1-12, 1-12)

Prerequisites; 60 hours and 2.5 GPA.  Practical experience off campus in a professional setting where the student works under the tutelage of a professional practitioner. (May be repeated for up to 3 credit hours towards graduation.) This course is graded on a Pass/Fail system

 

 

Courses Required for the Marketing Minor

The student minoring in marketing must satisfactorily complete 18 credit hours of study, including 12 hours of required courses (MRK 310, 315, 318, and 415), and 6 hours of electives from the following courses: MRK 311, 470 or BUS 481, 482, or 483.

 

MRK 310 – Principles of Marketing (3)

Prerequisite: Junior standing.  A survey of the principles, terminology, and functions of marketing, emphasizing product, price, place, and promotion.  The course will provide an understanding of the role of marketing in the business environment.

 

MRK 311 – Consumer Behavior (3)

Prerequisite: MRK 310.  The objective of the study of consumer behavior is to provide students with a comprehensive knowledge of consumer buying patterns and business marketing strategies. Students will gain an understanding of the psychological (micro) process that consumers use to make buying decisions, as well as the cultural (macro) influences that shape the modern retail marketing process.

 

MRK 315 – Selling Principles and Methods (3)

Prerequisite: MRK 310.  Examination of principles and methods of selling with emphasis on the development of effective salesperson/customer relationships and presentations. 

 

MRK 318 – Principles of Advertising (3)

Prerequisites: MRK 310 for business administration and accounting majors/minors, BUS 101 or ART 218 or COM 208 for all other students.  This is an intermediate-level advertising class addressing the structure of the advertising industry including agency, marketing, and public relations uses.  The course covers advertising rationales, concepts, ethics, research methods, strategies, planning and the media mix including buying and placement considerations. 

 

MRK 415 – Advanced Sales Communications (3)

Prerequisite: MRK 315. This course will examine the many dynamic aspects of interpersonal communication as it relates to professional selling. Course objectives will include practical interpersonal communication skills, perceptions, listening, non-verbal communication, group dynamics, and professionalism.  Additional learning objectives include planning and preparing sales messages, oral communications (both one-on-one and group), and adapting messages for specific sales situations.

 

MRK 470  – Strategic Marketing (3)

Prerequisite: MRK 310.  The application of marketing concepts and techniques in a case study environment with emphasis on consumer behavior and the practical applications of marketing strategy.

 

 

THE FULL TIME FACULTY

 

Business Administration/Accounting Departments

 

KIM BIANCO, Assistant Professor, Accounting

M.B.A., Florida Southern College

    Certified Public Accountant

 

JOHNNY HOWARD, Assistant Professor, Business Administration; Department Chair, Business Administration

      B.A., American Intercontinental University

      M.B.A., American Intercontinental University

      Ph.D. Northcentral University

 

RICHARD C. LEONARD, Professor, Business Administration

       Ph.D., Walden University

                                                                                                                                            

PAUL MICHAEL, Visiting Instructor, Business Administration

      M.B.A., Barry University

 

Education Department

 

ANNA BURNLEY, Assistant Professor, Education; TESOL Specialist, Education

      Ed.D., Carson-Newman University

 

ANDREA CARLILE, Assistant Professor, Education; Department Chair, Education

      M.S., Florida State University

 

SUSAN CHAVIANO, Assistant Professor, Education; Exceptional Student Education Coordinator, Education

      Ph.D., Columbia State University

 

MELANIE JENSEN, Professor, Education

      Ph.D., Florida State University

     

SUSAN MARTELLI, Coordinator of Clinical Education

      M.A., University of South Florida

 

SUSAN STRAUSS, Professor, Education; Reading and Language Arts Coordinator, Education

      Ph.D., Florida State University

 

Strategic Communication (Public Relations) Department

 

MATTHEW THOMPSON, Assistant Professor, Strategic Communication; Department Chair, Strategic Communication

      M.S., Florida State University

 

CAROL GRAHAM, Associate Professor, Strategic Communication

      Ph.D., Florida State University

 

 

 


ADMINISTRATION

 

WAYNE RIGGS, Dean

      B.A., Grove City College

      M.A., Marquette University

      Ph.D., Marquette University                                                                                         

     

DONNA BOSTWICK, Assistant Director of Admissions and Marketing

      B.S., Florida State University

 

SHAWNIQUE BRANCH, Assistant Registrar

      MTax, Nova Southeastern University

 

KEVIN HARRINGTON, Assistant Director of HR/Academic Services

      M.S., Florida State University

 

LINDA SMITH, College Secretary

     

ANNETTE YOUNG, Coordinator of Financial Aid

      B.S., University of Utah

 

MARY PAT ZACKER, Secretary, Education Department

 

 

 



USE OF PHOTOGRAPHS, VIDEO OR FILM BY THE COLLEGE

 

The College reserves the right to use any photograph, video, or film taken on college property or at a college-sponsored event without the expressed written permission of those contained within the photograph, video, or film. Such photographs, videos, or film may be used in publications or video material produced, used or contracted by the College, including but not limited to: view books, catalogs, handbooks, flyers, website, social media sites, newspapers, magazines, television and videos.  

Individuals who do not wish for their photograph or videotaping image to be taken should contact the Admissions Office.